Little Chute Historical Society

www.littlechutehistory.org

Person Page 8,325

Arthur Dickrell

M, b. January 30, 1900, d. June 29, 1933

Parents

Family: Mary Klapperich (b. December 1, 1898, d. January 14, 1971)

Biography

  • Birth: Arthur Dickrell was born on January 30, 1900.
  • Death: He died on June 29, 1933, at age 33.
  • Burial: He was buried in St Anna, Calumet Co, Wisconsin.
  • Note: Arthur Dickrell is the Victim of Poison Murder in County.
    Attempt to Murder Whole Family Made.
    Poisoning of Man, Woman and Four Children is Believed to be Act of Person
    Suffering with a Diseased Mind – Mother and Her Children Are in Serious Condition.

    Arthur Dickrell, 33-year-old Town Russell farmer, is dead, his wife and four
    children are in serious condition in Plymouth hospital, and two others are under
    the care physicians as the result of arsenic poisoning with which they became
    afflicted over a week ago.
    The case, which is one the most tragic and pathetic that has come to the attention
    of the county authorities in many years, is being thoroughly investigated. It may
    take several days before responsibility for the poisoning will be known. Indications
    are that Mrs. Dickrell put arsenic in the food, but authorities have not attached
    definite blame to her yet.
    A pathetic sidelight of the case is that besides being the mother of four children,
    the eldest of whom is seven and the youngest, two, Mrs. Dickrell is to become the
    mother of a fifth child.
    Mr. Dickrell died in Plymouth hospital at 5 a.m. today. He had been ill for about
    a week, and his condition grew more serious each day until yesterday when Dr. Steve
    O’Donnell of Kiel advised his removal to the hospital in an ambulance.
    Mrs. Dickrell, who is 36 years old, has been in the hospital since Tuesday. Her
    condition was pronounced as critical.
    The four Dickrell children, Frances Marie, aged 2; Ambrose and Anthony, twins,
    aged 5 and Joseph, aged 7, were taken to hospital this morning. All the children
    are in a weakened condition, and will require most careful attention.
    Miss Elfrieda Schmitz of the town of Russell, who was employed to assist Mrs.
    Dickrell during the past eight weeks, became ill Sunday, and went home. She did
    not know the cause of her illness. Today, Miss Schmitz and Joseph Klapperich, of
    St. Ann, father of Mrs. Dickrell, who had occasionally visited his daughter’s home,
    were taken to Plymouth hospital for examination, and both are under the care of
    physicians.
    Sheriff Ernst Zehms said after an investigation today that a petition asking that
    Mrs. Dickrell be examined for her sanity has been filed with County Judge F.H.
    Schlichting, and that in all probability the examination will be conducted, if Mrs.
    Dickrell recovers from her present critical condition.
    A post mortem examination of the body of Mr. Dickrell was conducted this morning by
    Coroner C.N. Sonnenburg. A portion of the stomach was removed, and Dr. Sonnenburg
    took it to Madison, where it was to be examind by a state toxicologist.
    First knowledge of the illness of Dickrell family was gained by relatives last
    Friday night, when Miss Catherine Dickrell, sister of Arthur, who is employed in
    the office of Dr. Edmund Knauf of Sheboygan, visited the farm, which is on County
    Highway H, four miles south of St. Ann.
    Miss Dickrell was accompanied by William Moritz, her fiance, of Milwaukee, she
    told The Sheboygan Press today.
    After Miss Dickrell had visited the Arthur Dickrell home, she went to the home of
    another brother, Nick Dickrell, who resides a short distance from his brother’s
    farm, and told him and members of his family that the entire Arthur Dickrell family
    was ill.
    “Arthur went to Dr. O’Donnell at Kiel, Thursday night,” Miss Dickrell told The Press.
    “He told the doctor that he and others of his family were suffering from stomach
    disorders that caused them to vomit frequently. The doctor gave him some medicine
    to give to them, and he returned.
    “Arthur thought the doctor would go to the farm Friday, but he did not go. I
    notified the doctor Saturday, and he went out and examined Arthur and his wife and
    the children.”
    Miss Dickrell said she and Mrs. Moritz went back to Elkhart Lake, where her parents
    reside, and stayed there Friday night, returning to the farm to assist in the farm
    work Saturday, and again Sunday. After that, Armin Gross of St. Ann was engaged
    to carry on the farm work. He has been assisted from time to time since then by
    relatives and others residing in the neighborhood.
    Interviewed by The Sheboygan Press today, Mr. Gross said he had been eating his
    meals away from the Dickrell place.
    Miss Madeline Deville of St. Ann has been taking care of the household duties since
    yesterday, and she has prepared her own meals, she said.
    After attention was called to the illness of the members of the Dickrell family
    Friday, neighbors became alarmed, fearing that a strange malady had seized them and
    that it might be contagious. Relatives were frequent visitors to the Dickrell home
    after that.
    On Monday evening a number of relatives gathered outside the home and were discussing
    the situation, Nick Dickrell said. During that time Mrs. Dickrell made statements
    which indicated that she had poisoned her husband, children and herself, Mr. Dickrell
    declared.
    “We were standing outside talking,” said Nick Dickrell, when Mrs. (Arthur) Dickrell,
    who had been watching us from the window, came out.
    “She said, ‘You are acting as if you think I poisoned them’ (Mr. Dickrell and the
    children). If you will come in the house I will tell you all about it.”
    Nick Dickrell stated that he and the others followed the woman in the house, and
    that she made a lengthy explanation.
    “She said that she had wanted to kill the children for a long time,” Mr. Dickrell
    continued.
    ‘Once she took two of them in an automobile with intention of gassing them, but she
    didn’t quite know how to do it, she told us.
    “Another time, she said, she went to Kiel and bought some strychnine, which she had
    planned to give the members of her family. She changed her mind about that, however,
    and took it back to Kiel. We haven’t investigated yet, so we don’t know whether she
    told us the truth about that or not.
    “We asked her way she wanted to kill her family, and she said, ‘The children are
    damned, Arthur is damned, I am damned, we are all damned, so we might as well all
    die. That’s the reason.’
    “After we heard her story, we concluded that her mind must have been affected. She
    had been acting somewhat strangely for a long time.”
    Mr. Dickrell said his brother and wife had not had any serious trouble so far as he
    knew. “They had little quarrels occasionally, the same as any man and wife have, I
    suppose,” he said. “But otherwise they seemed to get along all right.”
    Coroner Sonnenburg said Dr. O’Donnell told him that Mrs. Dickrell is expecting a
    fifth child, and that this might have affected her mind.
    Mrs. Dickrell did not reveal how she poisoned her husband and children, and it was
    not until yesterday that she was suspected of having put arsenic in their food.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Klapperich, parents of Mrs. Arthur Dickrell, went to the home
    yesterday to help with the farm work. They planned to spray a field of potatoes
    with arsenic, and they stopped on the way to Elkhart Lake to ascertain how much
    arsenic the Dickrells had from last year’s supply.
    They asked Arthur Dickrell where he kept his arsenic, and were informed that it was
    on the pantry floor under a shelf with a cover over it.
    Nick Dickrell stated that Mr. and Mrs. Klapperich searched for the poison, but could
    not find it in the place described by Mr. Dickrell. Finally they found it on a pantry
    shelf. It had been uncovered, and appeared as though it had been used recently, Mr.
    Dickrell said. Then it was concluded that Mrs. Dickrell had administered poison to
    her family and herself in food. When questioned about it today, she denied it,
    Questioned by Sheriff Zehms, Miss Schmitz said that while she was employed by Mrs.
    Dickrell, it was her duty to start preparation of bread and other food, and that
    Mrs. Dickrell finished the work.
    “I never saw her put anything in the food,” Miss Schmitz was quoted by the sheriff
    as having said. “But every time I ate bread or potatoes, I became nauseated and had
    vomiting spells. Others of the family suffered the same way as I did.”
    Miss Schmitz said Mrs. Dickrell acted strangely at times, according to the sheriff.
    The arsenic, as well as bread that Mrs. Dickrell had baked recently, other food she
    had prepared, and ingredients used in the preparation of foods for the family, were
    turned over to the county authorities today.
    Mr. Dickrell, who was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Dickrell of Elkhart Lake, and
    Mrs. Dickrell, nee Mary Klapperich, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Klapperich of
    St. Ann, were married about eight years ago.
    (This article includes pictures of the family members and the family home with a
    caption.)
    Sheboygan Press, Thurs. June 29, 1933, p. 1, c. 1
    ***********
    Plan Inquest in Poison Case. Arsenic Was Given in Food; Quiz Woman.
    Mrs. Arthur Dickrell, Widow of Poisoned Man, Proves Incoherent When
    Interviewed by the District Attorney and Sheriff.

    Following a conference today, District Attorney Charles A. Copp and Coroner
    C.N. Sonnenburg ordered an inquest to determine all the facts surrounding
    the death in Plymouth hospital early Thursday of Arthur Dickrell, town of
    Russell.
    A jury was to be drawn this afternoon, and was to view the remains of Mr.
    Dickrell at the home on Highway H, four miles south of St. Ann at 5 p.m.
    The inquest will be held at the city hall in Plymouth at 9 a.m. Monday.
    Coroner Sonnenburg took a portion of Mr. Dickrell’s stomach to Madison
    after he had performed a post mortem examination Thursday, and it is to be
    examined there by the state toxicologist. Dr. Sonnenburg expects to have a
    report of the findings Saturday afternoon.
    Everything indicates that Mr. Dickrell’s death and the serious illness of
    his wife and four children, Miss Elfrieda Schmitz, who was employed by the
    Dickrells, and Joseph Klapperich, father of Mrs. Dickrell, is the result
    of arsenic poison administered through food, District Attorney Copp said.
    Definite responsibility for placing the poison in the food has not been
    placed as yet.
    “Yesterday, I investigated the case as far as it was possible,” Mr. Copp
    said. “In company with Sheriff Ernst Zehms, I visited the Plymouth hospital
    and questioned Mrs. Dickrell, but her condition was such that I could not
    talk to her as much as I wanted to. Her conversation was entirely incoherent,
    and I decided to wait until today to continue my questioning, hopeful that her
    condition will be somewhat improved, and that she may divulge her connection
    with the case.”
    “Up to the present time,” Mr. Copp stated, “there is no direct evidence as to
    how the poison got into the food.”
    The district attorney asserted that he had interviewed a number of relatives
    and acquaintances of the Dickrells, and that everyone who has any information
    to offer in regard to the cause of death of Mr. Dickrell and the illness of
    seven others will have the opportunity to give it to the coroner’s jury.
    The condition of two of the Dickrell children and of Miss Schmitz is stil
    serious, Dr. Steven O’Donnell of Kiel, who is attending them, stated today.
    Dr. O’Donnell corrected an impression created by a statement of Miss Catherine
    Dickrell in yesterday’s article that he had been called to the Dickrell farm
    Thursday to attend members of the family.
    “Arthur Dickrell came to me Thursday evening and claimed that he and his family
    were suffering from stomach flu,” Dr. O’Donnell said. “He diagnosed the cases
    himself, and did not ask me to do it. He said he and his family had been ill
    for about a month, and he wanted a bottle of medicine to cure their illness.
    “I said that, if he and his family had been sick a month, their cases should be
    investigated immediately or at the latest the following morning. But, according
    to Mr. Dickrell’s opinion that was not necessary. He thought a bottle of
    medicine would do the work. This was contrary to my opinion, but I did not feel
    that I should go without being asked.
    “Mr. Dickrell said that when he needed my services further, he would notify me.
    I received my first call to go out to the farm at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, and I went
    out. I diagnosed the cases as being the result of poison of some kind, and
    treated the patients accordingly.”
    Mrs. Joseph Klapperich, mother of Mrs. Dickrell, and a Kiel physician who had
    previously attended Mrs. Dickrell and who had known her several years, said she
    had acted peculiarly for some time, District Attorney Copp said, however,
    according to Coroner Sonnenburg.
    Mrs. Klapperich stated that her daughter had complained of “having something
    wrong with her head,” but that her husband did not want to send her to an
    institution because of his deep affection for her.
    Before her marriage, Mrs. Dickrell had been employed in a Kiel physician’s office,
    and she had gone to him for treatment after that. A few months ago, according to
    the district attorney, the Kiel physician observed a difference in her mental
    attitude.
    Mrs. Klapperich stated that she and her husband and a farm hand, Joseph Stanz, had
    all eaten some of the bread in which poison had been placed, and that they had
    become ill afterward.
    “I didn’t know what was wrong with the bread, but it didn’t taste right and I didn’t
    eat much of it,” she declared. “My husband and Art ate a good deal of it, though.”
    Sheboygan Press, Fri. June 30, 1933, p. 1, c. 1
    **********
    Mrs. Dickrell Removed to County Asylum. Hold Rites for Victim of Poison.
    Mrs. Dickrell Taken to Asylum for Treatment – Await Word from Madison.
    Mrs. Arthur Dickrell, whom county authorities suspect of having poisoned her husband
    and seven others at their Town of Russell home, resulting in Mr. Dickrell’s death
    last Thursday, is in the Sheboygan county hospital for the insane pending further
    investigation of the poisoning case.
    An order temporarily committing her there was signed Saturday by County Judge F.H.
    Schlichting, and she was removed from Plymouth hospital to the county institution
    by Sheriff Ernst C. Zehms on Saturday afternoon.
    District Attorney Charles A. Copp stated that Mrs. Dickrell’s condition was such
    that it became necessary to send her to the insane hospital in order to give her
    the kind of treatment she requires.
    Funeral services for Mr. Dickrell were conducted at the Catholic church at St.
    Ann on Saturday by the Rev. Father J.H. Schmitt. The church was packed to capacity,
    and a large crowd stood outside while the services were under way. The funeral was
    one of the largest ever held in the vicinity of St. Ann.
    Due to the condition of Mrs. Dickrell and her children, none of the immediate
    members of the family was able to attend the funeral.
    Coroner C.N. Sonnenburg has not received the findings of the state toxicologist
    on his examination of a portion of Mr. Dickrell’s stomach which was taken to
    Madison for examination by Coroner Sonnenburg after a post mortem examination
    had been conducted the day of his death. It may be received about Thursday,
    after which a coroner’s inquest will be conducted in Plymouth.
    Members of the coroner’s jury are: Clyde Ellis of Elkhart Lake, Milton Timm and
    Arthur Seefeldt of Plymouth, George Knoblauch and Robert Mauer of Elkhart Lake,
    and Joseph Spatt of Sheboygan.
    A can of arsenate of lead, bread and other food believed to contain arsenate of
    lead have also been taken to the state toxicologist for examination and report.
    The condition of Miss Elfrieda Schmitz, who was employed by the Dickrells until
    a week ago Sunday when she became ill after eating food alleged to have contained
    poison, is unchanged at Plymouth hospital today, it was reported. The four Dickrell
    children are reported improving, as is Joseph Klapperich, father of Mrs. Dickrell,
    who was examined at the hospital and who is still under a physician’s observation.
    Funeral services for Arthur Dickrell were held at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at St. Ann’s
    church. The Holy Name Society led the cortege with their banner draped in mourning
    and escorted the body to the cemetery for burial.
    “There are times when condolence seems sheer mockery,” the Rev. Father Schmitt
    said during the course of his remarks to relatives of the deceased. “Human words
    of sympathy are inadequate mitigate or alleviate the sorrowing and bleeding heart
    of the bereaved relatives and friends on an occasion of this kind. When human aid
    is exhausted, we must take refuge in God, the Author and Source of holy religion.”
    Pallbearers were Edward and Nick Jeanty, John Wieseckle, Irwin and Walter Roeder
    and Armin Gross.
    Among those who attended the services from away were Mr. and Mrs. John Klapperick
    and family of Kiel, Mr. and Mrs. Anton Klapperick and family of New Holstein, Mr.
    and Mrs. Ed Casper, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Casper, Mrs. Peter Casper, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert
    Casper of Marytown, Joseph Nett, Joseph Stephany and Joseph Wagner of Johnsburg,
    Mrs. Matt Wagner of Calvary, Mr. and Mrs. William Wagner of St. Joe, Mr. and Mrs.
    John Jeanty of Stockbridge, Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Huberty of Kiel, Mr. and Mrs.
    Theodore Huberty of Kiel, Mr. and Mrs. Mueller of St. Cloud, Mrs. Peter J. Schmitz
    and daughter, Eleanor, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Weber and Mrs. Tille Lacroix of Marytown,
    Mrs. William Sievert, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Sievert and Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lacroix and
    family of Steinthal, Mr. and Mrs. Nic Michels, Mr. and Mrs. John Jost and family,
    Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Pul, Emil Becker and Mrs. Mathew Becker of Kiel, Mr. and Mrs.
    Andrew Michels, Mrs. Eliza Mushberger, Mrs. Theresa Hoeflier of Elkhart Lake,
    Mr. and Mrs. Anton Dohr, Ed Dohr, Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Dohr and Mathew Winkels
    of Hilbert, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lacroix of Glenbeulah, Silvan Klehr of Random Lake,
    Ed Grabinger of Fredonia, John P. Stahl and family and Jacob Grabinger of Batavia,
    John Michels, Mrs. R. Hanke and Alfred Mushberger and family of Sheboygan, Mrs.
    John Dickrell, John N. Dickrell, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dorn, Mrs. Ed Schang, Mrs.
    Cleo Nelli, William Moritz and Mrs. F.J. Fichter of Milwaukee, Henry Schram and
    family of Cleveland, Wis., John Schram and family of Spring Valley, and Mr. and
    Mrs. Andrew Dickrell and family of Appleton.
    The deceased, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Dickrell of Elkhart Lake, was born Jan.
    30, 1900, in the town of Russell. He lived in the town of Russell all his life
    and was a devout member of the Catholic church and a member of the Holy Name
    society since its organization.
    Sheboygan Press, Mon. July 3, 1933, p. 1, c. 5
    ***********
    Find Poison Caused Death of Arthur Dickrell. Arsenic in Flour Also, is Finding.
    Plot to Murder an Entire Family is Obvious in Report from Toxicologist.
    Re: Arthur Dickrell (Deceased) Preliminary examination of materials in case shows
    that the stomach and contents, sample of bread and flour, all contain arsenic. In
    all probablilty this is a case of acute arsenic poisoning. Letter follows. R.P.
    Herwick, State Toxicologist.
    District Attorney Charles A. Copp received the foregoing message from State
    Toxicologist R.P. Herwick of Madison today. The message is a preliminary report
    on the examination of the portion of stomach of Arthur Dickrell, Town Russell farmer,
    who died of arsenic poisoning, together with bread and flour which were sent to him
    for examination. It bears out the theory that Arthur Dickrell was a murder victim
    and that an attempt was made to murder the entire Dickrell family by putting arsenic
    in their food. The findings of the state toxicologist make wholesale murder plot
    beyond any doubt since it shows that even the flour, which Attorney Copp scooped up
    out of the flour bin in the Dickrell home and which was used in making bread for the
    entire family, contained the deadly arsenic poison. Mr. Copp stated following receipt
    of the telegram that he will await the detailed report of the state toxicologist,
    which will probably arrive late today or tomorrow, after which the inquest will be
    held. Mr. Dickrell died in Plymouth hospital after a violent illness which wracked
    his whole system. Mrs. Dickrell, who was thought to have eaten some of the food
    containing the poisoning and who has been questioned at length by District Attorney
    Copp as to her connection with the poison plot, has been in the Sheboygan county
    hospital for the insane since last Saturday evening. She is believed insane and
    was removed to the county institution because it was deemed a place where she would
    receive proper care pending the murder inquiry. Miss Elfrieda Schmitz, who was
    employed as a maid on the Dickrell farm, is still in serious condition in Plymouth
    hospital as the result of having eaten food containing the poison. The four Dickrell
    children are improving at Plymouth hospital, but are not entirely out of danger,
    according to hospital reports. Joseph Klapperich, father of Mrs. Dickrell, who also
    ate some of the poisoned food, is out of danger. All those who suffered from the
    poison are under the observation of physicians.
    Sheboygan Press, Thurs. July 6, 1933, p. 1, c. 8
    **********
    Jury Directs Blame to Mrs. Arthur Dickrell. Testimony is Given at Plymouth.
    Arsenic Poisoning Given as the Cause of Death of Arthur Dickrell.
    (By Staff Reporter). Plymouth, Wis. –
    A coroner’s jury at noon today concluded that Arthur Dickrell, town of Russell
    farmer, died at Plymouth hospital on June 29, 1933, from arsenic poisoning by
    eating bread prepared by Mrs. Mary Dickrell, and expressed a belief that Mrs.
    Dickrell was responsible for the death.
    The full text of the verdict, which was returned by the jury composed of Clyde
    Ellis of Elkhart Lake, Milton Timm, George Knoblauch and Arthur Seefeldt of
    Plymouth, Joe Spatt of Sheboygan, and Robert Maurer of Elkhart Lake, follows:
    “An inquisition taken at Plymouth, Wis., in the county of Sheboygan on the 20th
    day of July, 1933, before C.N. Sonnenburg, coroner of said county, upon the view
    of the body of Arthur Dickrell, there dead, by the jurors, whose names are
    hereunto subscribed, who being duly sworn to inquire in behalf of this state when,
    in what manner, and by what means the said Arthur Dickrell came to his death, up
    their oaths do say, Arthur Dickrell died on June 29, 1933, at Plymouth hospital
    at 5:10 a.m., from arsenic poisoning by eating bread prepared by Mrs. Mary Dickrell,
    his wife, and we believe Mrs. Mary Dickrell to be responsible for said death.”
    Testimony of fourteen witnesses corroborated information contained in Sheboygan
    Press accounts of the death of Mr. Dickrell and illness of others. That Mrs.
    Dickrell had acted strangely and was probably demented, that she had intended
    on former occasions to kill members of her family, once by giving them strychnine
    and once by taking the children in the family automobile with a plan to asphyxiate
    them, was borne out in testimony at the inquest.
    Witnesses said Mrs. Dickrell had on one occasion tried to buy strychnine from a
    veterinarian, had actually purchased an eighth of an ounce at a Kiel drug store
    at another time, but had returned it, and that she also admitted she wanted to
    asphyxiate the children with carbon monoxide gas from their automobile, but gave
    up because she did not know how to do it. Several of the witnesses also testified
    that the woman appeared to have been mentally deranged for several months.
    Dr. O.J. Gutsch of Sheboygan, the first witness called, testified that Mrs. Dickrel
    was suffering from illusionary religious insanity with homicidal tendencies on
    July 11, when he examined her at the Sheboygan county hospital for the chronic
    insane.
    She had no organic ailment, except that the indications are she is an expectant
    mother, and that she had been undernourished, and was anemic. She was in a nervous
    state and was depressed, Dr. Gutsch said. He declared she insisted she had not put
    poison in the food.
    Mrs. Dickrell told Dr. Gutsch that she had a vision or session with the spirits in
    which she had been informed that Mr. Dickrell, as well as herself, were damned and
    would be better off dead, he testified. She did not learn of her husband’s death
    until July 10.
    The witness said that Mrs. Dickrell’s mental condition was not induced by the fact
    that she is to become a mother, although it was probably aggravated by that
    condition.She had been incoherent and irrational about ten months, he said, and had
    performed peculiar acts as early as the latter part of last October.
    Dr. R.P. Herwick, state toxicologist, testified that he had examined contents of
    Mr. Dickrell’s stomach and other organs and a sample of bread taken to him by
    Coroner Sonnenburg, as well as samples of flour and a can of arsenate of lead
    taken by District Attorney Copp, and had found them to contain arsenate of lead.
    His conclusion was that Mr. Dickrell’s death was undoubtedly due to arsenic
    poisoning. Bones of those who ate food containing the arsenate of lead without
    doubt have lead deposited in them, he said.
    Dr. Joseph Mueller of Plymouth, who assisted in attending Mr. Dickrell before his
    death and who also assisted in performing the autopsy following death, said death
    was without doubt due to arsenic poisoning. The kind of poison from which he was
    suffering, however, was not definitely known until after the state toxicologist
    had given his report after examining Mr. Dickrell’s organs and the sample of bread
    and flour.
    Dr. Mueller said Mr. Dickrell was in a stupor and beyond help when he was taken to
    the hospital. No attempt was made to give him medicine to counteract the poison,
    he stated, because the poison had already taken its deadly effect.
    Dr. Fred Knauf of Kiel, who has known Mrs. Dickrell for about sixteen years,
    observed her failing mental condition during the past year or more, he testified.
    She had at one time been employed in his office, and he had treated her several
    times since then. Late last winter, when he attended her, he noted a considerable
    change in her mental attitude. She was highly nervous and apprehensive at the time,
    he stated.
    Dr. Willard Verbeck of St. Ann examined Mrs. Dickrell last March, and advised her
    husband and her father to take her to an institution as the “best and safest thing
    to do,” he testified. Replying to a question by District Attorney Copp, the
    physician expressed a belief that she might have been a dangerous type of insane
    person.
    Miss Elfrieda Schmitz of the town of Russell, who was employed at the Dickrell
    home from April 10 until the Sunday before Mr. Dickrell’s death, stated that she
    had started the bread making on several occasions, but was with one exception,
    always told after a certain stage in the preliminary breadmaking operations to do
    something else, and that Mrs. Dickrell would finish the task. On one occasion,
    Miss Schmitz prepared and baked the bread, she said.
    According to her testimony, Miss Schmitz became ill several times after eating
    bread at the Dickrell home. She never suspected that Mrs. Dickrell was putting
    poison in the food, she said. She saw a can of arsenate of lead on a pantry
    shelf at one time, she stated, but there seemed to be nothing unusual about that
    at the time.
    Miss Schmitz told of eating biscuists and bread made by Mrs. Dickrell and observing
    that they had a peculiar taste.
    Mr. Dickrell complained about the bread’s taste to Mrs. Dickrell several times,
    and once bought baker’s bread, Miss Schmitz said.
    There was no discord between Mr. and Mrs. Dickrell nor among the neighbors so far
    as Miss Schmitz knew, she stated.
    Dr. Steven O’Donnell of Kiel, who attended the poison victims, said that Mr.
    Dickrell went to his office on June 22 and said he and his family were suffering
    from a stomach disorder, and he wanted some medicine. Dr. O’Donnell prescribed
    medicine for them, and on June 24 went to the farm and examined his patients,
    determining at the time that they were suffering from some sort of poisoning, he
    asserted. Mrs. Dickrell was mentally, but not physically ill, he added. He took
    a sample of bread from the Dickrell home, intending to mail it to Madison for
    examination, but in the meantime, Mr. Dickrell died, and the sample was turned
    over to Coroner Sonnenburg, the doctor stated.
    Stewart Lindsay, a Kiel pharmacist, testified that Mrs. Dickrell bought an eighth
    of an ounce of strychnine from him on March 28, but later returned it. When he
    asked her what she wanted it for, she said she intended to poison rats, he said,
    and he told her there were other rat exterminators that were less dangerous, but
    she did not want them.
    Dr. I.A. Walsdorf, a Kiel veterinarian, testified that when he visited the
    Dickrell farm on May 19, Mrs. Dickrell wanted to buy some strychnine from him,
    but he advised her to use a less dangerous rat exterminator, and she decided
    she did not want anything.
    Joe Stanz of Kiel, who was employed at the Dickrell farm on June 23, told of
    becoming seriously ill after eating at the Dickrell home. He had two meals
    there, dinner and supper, eating a slice of bread that tasted peculiar at the
    noon meal, but none at the evening meal.
    Joseph Klapperich of the town of New Holstein, Calumet county, father of Mrs.
    Dickrell, also told of the peculiar taste in bread he ate at his daughter’s
    home, and of finding a can containing a small quantity of arsenate of lead in
    the cupboard at the Dickrell residence. He and Mrs. Klapperich both became
    ill after eating bread there, he said.
    The day Mrs. Dickrell was taken to the hospital, Mr. and Mrs. klapperich returned
    to the Dickrell farm, and Mr. Klapperich suggested that the potatoes should be
    sprayed, he said. Mr. Dickrell was ill, and Mr. Klapperich wanted the farm hand
    to do the work. Mr. Klapperich said that when he asked Arthur Dickrell where the
    arsenate of lead was, Mr. Dickrell described the place where it should have been,
    but it was not there.
    “Finally, my wife and I found it in the cupboard,” he said. “She (Mrs. Klapperich)
    look at me and I looked at her. We both remembered that the doctor had told us the
    children had been poisoned. I told my wife to the get the bread, and I cut it open
    and hid it. Later, I went to Kiel and told the doctor what I had found and asked
    him to come out,” he stated. “I showed him the bread, as well as the arsenate of
    lead, and he took the bread along.”
    Mr. Klapperich also told of advising Mr. Dickrell that because of her mental
    condition, Mr. Dickrell should take his wife to an insane asylum. He quoted Mr.
    Dickrell as having said that, if she were taken, he would go, too, and he said Mr.
    Dickrell cried about it.
    Mrs. Klapperich, mother of Mrs. Dickrell, gave testimony similar to that given by
    her husband. She added that her daughter had confessed having taken her children
    in the family automobile and intending to asphyxiate them. Her daughter had acted
    strangely for a long time, the mother testified.
    Nick Dickrell, brother of Arthur, also told of hearing Mrs. Dickrell say she wanted
    to asphyxiate her children, and that she had bought some strychnine, intending to
    poison the family.
    The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh WI)
    Sheboygan Press, Thurs. July 20, 1933, p. 1, c. 8.

Mary Klapperich

F, b. December 1, 1898, d. January 14, 1971

Parents

Family: Arthur Dickrell (b. January 30, 1900, d. June 29, 1933)

Biography

  • Birth: Mary Klapperich was born on December 1, 1898 in Marytown, Fond du Lac Co, Wisconsin.
  • Death: She died on January 14, 1971, at age 72.
  • Burial: She was buried in St Anna, Calumet Co, Wisconsin.
  • Note: Mrs. Mary Dickrell, 71, formerly of the Town of Russell, died Thursday after a long illness. The daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Klapprich was born on Dec. 1, 1899 at Marytown, and was married to Arthur Dickrell in September, 1925, at St. Anna. The couple farmed in Russell until his death in 1933.
    Surviving are four sons, a daughter, four sisters and 23 grandchildren. A brother preceded her in death. The funeral Mass will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. Anna Catholic Church, St. Anna, the Rev. Cyril Heeswyk, celebrant.
    Burial will be in the church cemetery. Friends may call Saturday morning at the Wittkopp Funeral Home, Plymouth, until time of church services.
    Sheboygan Press, Fri. Jan. 15, 1971, p. 14, c. 4
    (Note: Her tombstone has b. 1898.)

Anthony L Dickrell

M, b. October 11, 1927, d. December 23, 2005

Parents

Family: Marilee Duwe

Biography

  • Birth: Anthony L Dickrell was born on October 11, 1927.
  • Death: He died on December 23, 2005, at age 78.
  • Burial: He was buried in Highland Memorial Park, Appleton, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.

Marilee Duwe

F

Family: Anthony L Dickrell (b. October 11, 1927, d. December 23, 2005)

William Anthony Dickrell

M

Parents

  • Descendant of an Immigrant on: America

Lydia Victoria Jefimowicz

F

Johanna VandenBroek

F, b. circa 1790

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Johanna VandenBroek was born circa 1790.

Jan Henricus VandenBroek

M, b. May 27, 1783

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Jan Henricus VandenBroek was born on May 27, 1783 in Nistelrode, Noord Brabant, Netherlands.

Antonetta VandenBroek

F, b. February 24, 1855

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Antonetta VandenBroek was born on February 24, 1855 in Nistelrode, Noord Brabant, Netherlands.

Claas VandenBogert

M, b. circa 1730

Family: Maria Reijnen (b. circa 1730)

Biography

  • Birth: Claas VandenBogert was born circa 1730.

Maria Reijnen

F, b. circa 1730

Family: Claas VandenBogert (b. circa 1730)

Biography

  • Birth: Maria Reijnen was born circa 1730.

Marilynn Martin

F

Parents

Danford Sindahl

M

Nicolaas VandenBroek

M, b. circa 1800

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Nicolaas VandenBroek was born circa 1800.

Petrus Aarts Schoenmakers

M, b. circa 1760

Parents

Family: Maria Anna VandenHeuvel (b. circa 1760)

Biography

  • Birth: Petrus Aarts Schoenmakers was born circa 1760.

Maria Anna VandenHeuvel

F, b. circa 1760

Family: Petrus Aarts Schoenmakers (b. circa 1760)

Biography

  • Birth: Maria Anna VandenHeuvel was born circa 1760.

Peter Arts Schoenmakers

M, b. circa 1730

Family: Maria Hendriks (b. circa 1730)

Biography

  • Birth: Peter Arts Schoenmakers was born circa 1730.

Maria Hendriks

F, b. circa 1730

Family: Peter Arts Schoenmakers (b. circa 1730)

Biography

  • Birth: Maria Hendriks was born circa 1730.

Albertus Arnoldus VandenBroek

M, b. circa 1760, d. July 4, 1823

Parents

Family: Anna Maria Elisabeth VanClarenbeek (b. circa 1760)

Biography

  • Birth: Albertus Arnoldus VandenBroek was born circa 1760.
  • Death: He died on July 4, 1823 in Uden, Noord Brabant, Netherlands.

Anna Maria Elisabeth VanClarenbeek

F, b. circa 1760

Family: Albertus Arnoldus VandenBroek (b. circa 1760, d. July 4, 1823)

Biography

  • Birth: Anna Maria Elisabeth VanClarenbeek was born circa 1760.

Arnoldus VandenBroek

M, b. circa 1740

Family: Maria VanBoekholt (b. January 27, 1740)

Biography

  • Birth: Arnoldus VandenBroek was born circa 1740.

Maria VanBoekholt

F, b. January 27, 1740

Parents

Family: Arnoldus VandenBroek (b. circa 1740)

Biography

  • Birth: Maria VanBoekholt was born on January 27, 1740 in 's-Hertogenbosch, Noord Brabant, Netherlands.

Adriaen Rijnders VanBoekholt

M, b. circa 1710

Parents

Family: Joanna Willemina Pronck (b. circa 1710)

Biography

  • Birth: Adriaen Rijnders VanBoekholt was born circa 1710.

Joanna Willemina Pronck

F, b. circa 1710

Family: Adriaen Rijnders VanBoekholt (b. circa 1710)

Biography

  • Birth: Joanna Willemina Pronck was born circa 1710.

Rijnders VanBoekholt

M, b. circa 1680

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Rijnders VanBoekholt was born circa 1680.