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Person Page 5,974

John le Strange

M, b. 1226

Parents

Family: Joan de Somery (b. 1225)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born in 1226 in Knockin, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: He was instructed by the King to surrender his possession of Montgomery Castle 1261 and 1263, it having been ordered to be made over to him 1260.

    He was not long-lived like his father and grandfather, who had held possession of their estates for fifty-six and thirty-five years respectively; he was only in possession for the short period of six and a half years, though he had been in active public life for more than twenty years previously. His wife was Joan, daughter of Roger de Somery, of Dudley Castle, co. Stafford, by his first wife Nicola, sister and co-heir of Hugh de Albini, last Earl of Arundel of that line. The latest date on which I can find proof that John le Strange was alive is May 23, 1275, on which day he released and quitclaimed to his brother Robert all his right in the manor of Wrockwardine by deed dated at 'Le Knokyn' on Ascension Day, 3 Edw. I. He must have died before November 20 following, as the Hundred Rolls of 3 Edw. I, which regnal year ended on that day, contain an inquisition held in the Hundred of Smethedon, whereat the jurors found that, on the death of John le Strange, the manor of Hunstanton, though not held in capite, was taken into the King's hands, and that the escheator levied from it one hundred shillings, and a horse worth twenty shillings. John le Strange can only have been about forty-five years old at this time; the cause of his death at so early an age is given by the subjoined entry in the bailiffs' accounts of Shrewsbury, which shows that he was drowned in the Severn. John le Strange was drowned while on horseback, and that his horse was consequently taken as a deodand, and the coroners had to account for its value to the royal exchequer. Three months or more were allowed to elapse before the issue of the writs of 'Diem Clausit Extremum' to the escheators of the various counties in which John le Strange held lands; on February 26, 1276, these writs were sent to the Sheriffs of Salop, Northampton, Leicester, Norfolk, and Gloucester, directing them to hold inquisitions, and to take into the King's hand all lands held in chief by the deceased. (Le Strange Records, page 154-167.)

Joan de Somery

F, b. 1225

Parents

Family: John le Strange (b. 1226)

Biography

  • Birth: Joan de Somery was born in 1225 in Dudley, Worcestershire, England.
  • Note: Joan de Someri, 2nd daughter, married Sir John le Strange of Knockin, County Salopdaughter of Roger de Somery and Nichole de Aubigny

    A grant was made to Joan on April 10, 1282, of the goods of James Elfrych of Hunstanton, forfeited to the King by reason of a felony for which he had abjured the realm. The manor of Olney, on the borders of Buckinghamshire and Northamptonshire, formed part of the inheritance of Hugh de Albini, Earl of Arundel, a fourth part of whose lands descended to his sister Nicola, the mother of Joan de Somery, wife of John le Strange (IV). Joan had three sisters, so a fourth part of the above fourth, i.e. one-sixteenth of the whole manor, came to John (V) in right of his mother. This was not divisible until her death, which must have taken place in 1282, as on December 15 of that year the Sheriff of Northampton was directed to commit to the four parceners--viz. Ralph de Cromwell and Margaret his wife, John le Strange, Walter de Sully and Mabel his wife, and Maud, late the wife of Henry de Erdington--the manor of Olney, so that they could till and sow the lands until Easter next. (Le Strange Records, page 191, 199.)

John le Strange

M, b. circa 1194

Parents

Family: Lucy de Tregoz (b. circa 1210, d. 1294)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born circa 1194 in Cheswardine, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: He he was in the Wars of Poitou in France. He was granted by Henry III the manor of Wrockwardine, Shropshire on 25 May 1231.

    He must have been about forty years of age when he did homage for his lands to King Henry III on January 20, 1234. He could hardly have been less than nineteen or twenty when he was employed on August 24, 1212, to convoy to King John the sum of œ60, the proceeds of stores sold by the King's orders at Shrewsbury. Two years later, in 1214, he was with King John in Poitou, helping in the attempt to recover the lost continental provinces; and in 1219 he was ordered to hold an inquisition of the Shropshire forests at Shrewsbury. At this period, as his father grew advanced in years, it is often difficult to feel sure whether mention of John le Strange refers to the father or the son, but it is probably the latter who, early in 1225, was one of six knights deputed to escort to Gloucester the proceeds of a tax of a fifteenth from Staffordshire and Salop. In 1230 John le Strange junior is expressly mentioned as being with Henry III in Brittany, Anjou, Poitou, and Gascony, when the King took the fealty of the nobles of those provinces. On February 20, 1232, the younger le Strange was sent with John fitz Alan to Llewelyn to obtain satisfaction for infractions of the truce. On October 24, 1236, le Strange was appointed to the office of Sheriff of the counties of Salop and Stafford. On March 8, 1238, Letters Patent were directed to Henry de Audley and John le Strange, ordering them to go, on the Saturday before mid-Lent, to meet Amaury de St. Amand, the King's Steward, and to make amends to Llewelyn for attacks made on him and his people.

    On August 4, 1241, the King commands John le Strange to cause to be conveyed to him at Salop the porpoise (porpesium) which the King's Treasurer of Ireland sent from that county to Chester. February 13, 1241 a patent giving notification that John le Strange, to whom the King has committed the castles of Montgomery, Shrewsbury, Bridgnorth, and Chester, has sworn on the Holy Gospels before the King, and bound himself by Letters Patent, that in the event of the King's death he will deliver the said castles to Eleanor, his Queen, to the use of Edward, his son and heir, or of another heir begotten by the said King of the said Queen; Edward was at that date an infant under two years of age. Soon after 1255 John le Strange made over to his third son, Roger, 'whatever he had in Ercall,' by which expression Eyton understands that he conveyed, not the mesnelordship, but such reversionary rights as would accrue whenever the abbot of Combermere's term expired. (Le Strange Records, page 99-121.)

Lucy de Tregoz

F, b. circa 1210, d. 1294

Parents

Family: John le Strange (b. circa 1194)

Biography

  • Birth: Lucy de Tregoz was born circa 1210 in Ewyas, Herefordshire, England.
  • Death: She died in 1294 in Knockin, Warwick, England.
  • Note: Lucia de Tregoz, wife of John (III), appears to have survived him for at least twenty-five years, if I am correct in assuming that she is the Lucia Extranea named in the Exchequer list of 1294-5, as a holder of œ40 a year and upwards in lands or rents in the name of dower in the counties of Bedford and Buckingham. By her John had four sons and two daughters; of the sons, John, the eldest, succeeded his father in the possession of his Shropshire and Norfolk estates; the second, Hamon, only survived his father for three or four years, so the conclusion of his story may well be set down at once, while that of the third brother, Roger, who did not die till 1311, may be reserved for a subsequent chapter, as also that of the youngest, Robert, who became the founder of the house of the Lords Strange of Blackmere. Of his daughter Alice, who had half the manor of Litcham as her marriage portion, mention has already been made. The other daughter, Hawyse, who married the Prince of Powys, survived her father and her husband for many years. (Le Strange Records, page 139-140.)

John le Strange

M, b. circa 1159

Parents

Family: Amicia (b. circa 1160)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born circa 1159 in Cheswardine, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: In 1196/7 he acquired rights in land at Knockin. In 1213 he was given the custody of the castle of Carreghova. He was granted manor of Kidderminster in 1216. On 7 June 1218 he was present at the dedication of Worcester Cathedral. He was dead by 20 January 1233/4, when his son did homage.

    He succeeded his father in his possessions in Norfolk and Shropshire in 1178-79, and as there is no mention of his lands having been taken into the King's hands, it is evident that he was already of full age. Immediately on his accession John (II) confirmed his father's grant of the church of Cheswardine to Haughmond, and, not long afterwards, confirmed William fitz Walter's charter, granting to the same abbey land at Middle, in which the latter had been enfeoffed by John's father. Another early deed of his, which I have mentioned in dealing with le Strange of Litcham, confirms a grant by his father of some land at Webblescowe to Haughmond. On May 12, 1195, John le Strange, when summoned to answer to the suit at Westminster, obtained an adjournment2 on the ground that he was employed on the King's service in Wales, where he was helping his dying cousin, Ralph le Strange of Alveley, in the protection of the silver mines of Carreghova. At the time of the accession of King John (1199), John le Strange (II) was in the prime of life, and must have been about forty years of age: he speedily became one of the new King's most trusted servants. A writ, under date May 11, 1223, from the King to the Treasurer, orders the latter to pay out of the Treasury to John le Strange 20 marks as a gift towards the expenses of fortifying his castle of 'Cnokin.' This gift, and the auxilium granted five years previously, show the importance attached to Knockin as a frontier fortress against North Wales. January 20, 1234, the King took the homage of John le Strange for the lands and tenements of which John his father was seised on the day of his death; and there is a mandate to the Sheriff of Shropshire ordering him to cause the said John to have full seisin of these lands, inasmuch as the King has pardoned him the Relief due therefrom. We may therefore place the close of the long life of John le Strange (II) as having occurred at the end of 1233, or the beginning of 1234. (Le Strange Records, page 59-82.)

Amicia

F, b. circa 1160

Family: John le Strange (b. circa 1159)

Biography

  • Birth: Amicia was born circa 1160.

John le Strange

M, b. circa 1138

Parents

Family: Hawise (b. circa 1140)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born circa 1138 in Cheswardine, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: William fitz Alan witnessed the grant of John le Strange (I) to Castleacre, and that John's father, Roland, witnessed Alan fitz Flaald's grant to the same priory, as well as his charter to St. Florent. Both families were connected with the counties of Norfolk and of Shropshire; John le Strange (I) held land in Hunstanton under fitz Alan, and that his brother Guy had a grant of lands in Warwickshire from William fitz Alan. For several successive generations it may almost be said that there is not a fitz Alan charter that is not witnessed by a le Strange, and vice versa. (Le Strange Records, page 9)

    John le Strange lived through the whole of the troublous reign of Stephen (1135-54), and during the first twenty-four years of the reign of Henry II. In Hunstanton he inherited two distinct manors, one from his father Roland, and another through his mother Matilda. Between the years 1155 and 1160 John's name occurs many times as a witness to charters, mostly those of fitz Alan. John and his brother Wido (Guy) attested a grant of fitz Alan's to the monks of Shrewsbury, which was included in Henry II's confirmation of 1155. (Le Strange Records, page 25.)

Hawise

F, b. circa 1140

Family: John le Strange (b. circa 1138)

Biography

  • Birth: Hawise was born circa 1140.

Roland le Strange

M, b. circa 1096

Parents

Family: Matilda le Brun (b. circa 1100)

Biography

  • Birth: Roland le Strange was born circa 1096 in Cheswardine, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: Mileham, Norfolkshire, England He witnessed the St. Florent Charter circa 1122. He was the first known ancestor of the House of le Strange. Roland must have lived at least as early as the reign of Henry I (1100-1135). A deed, discovered by Eyton in the Castleacre Chartulary, settles decisively that Roland le Strange was the father of John le Strange (I) and his three brothers, and also gives the name of Roland's wife as Matilda. This charter must have passed between 1160, when Hamo died, and 1179, when John died. Roland le Strange was succeeded by his eldest son John, and also left three other sons, Hamon, Guy, and Ralph, all of whom were enfeoffed in lands in Shropshire in the middle of the twelfth century. It does not, of course, follow that, because no daughters are recorded, none existed. In feudal times women, unless they were heiresses, were of small account. (Le Strange Records, page 5, 20.)

Matilda le Brun

F, b. circa 1100

Parents

Family: Roland le Strange (b. circa 1096)

Biography

  • Birth: Matilda le Brun was born circa 1100 in Cheswardine, Shropshire, England.

Guy le Strange

M, b. 1048, d. 1105

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Guy le Strange was born in 1048 in Norfolk, England.
  • Death: He died in 1105, at age ~57.
  • Note: The family sprang from a mythical Duke of Brittany, whose younger son, Guy, settled in England. It is said that, at a Justs held in the Peke of Derbyshire at Castle Peverell where, amongst divers other persons of note, Oweyn Prince of Wales, and a son of the King of Scots, were present, there were also two sons of the Duke of Bretaigne; and that the younger of them, named Guy, was called Guy le Strange, from whom the several families of the le Stranges did descend. (Le Strange Records, page 1-2.)

Hoel le Strange

M, b. circa 1020

Family: Hawise (b. circa 1020)

Biography

  • Birth: Hoel le Strange was born circa 1020.

Hawise

F, b. circa 1020

Family: Hoel le Strange (b. circa 1020)

Biography

  • Birth: Hawise was born circa 1020.

Ralph FitzHerlewin Hunstaton le Brun

M, b. circa 1068

Parents

Family: Helewisa of Plais (b. circa 1072)

Biography

  • Birth: Ralph FitzHerlewin Hunstaton le Brun was born circa 1068 in Hunstanton, Norfolk, England.
  • Note: Eyton shows that this grant must have been made not later than January 1174, as the Chartulary from which it is quoted contains also a recital and confirmation of it, made at the petition of John le Strange by William Turbus, Bishop of Norwich, who died on January 16, 1174. The grant proves that three generations previously Edgefield had been in the possession of Ralph de Hunstanton, and since then successively in that of his sons, Simon and Reginald le Brun, after whom it came to John le Strange as the direct heir. Simon and Reginald must therefore have died without issue, and John must have been the son of their sister, not named in this deed, but whose name, Matilda, is mentioned by John in his grant to the Priory of Castleacre. Ralph de Hunstanton, the maternal grandfather of John le Strange (I), is undoubtedly the same as Ralph fitz Herluin, recorded in Domesday as a vassal of Roger Bigod, holding land under him at Hunstanton and Tottington. (Le Strange Records, page 12.)

Helewisa of Plais

F, b. circa 1072

Parents

Family: Ralph FitzHerlewin Hunstaton le Brun (b. circa 1068)

Biography

  • Birth: Helewisa of Plais was born circa 1072 in Barnham, Suffolk, England.

Herlewin Hunstaton Brun

M, b. circa 1038

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Herlewin Hunstaton Brun was born circa 1038 in Hunstanton, Norfolk, England.

Hugh of Plais

M, b. circa 1042

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Hugh of Plais was born circa 1042 in Barnham, Suffolk, England.

Robert II de Tregoz

M, b. 1190, d. May 4, 1265

Parents

Family: Juliana de Cantilupe (b. circa 1192, d. August 6, 1285)

Biography

  • Birth: Robert II de Tregoz was born in 1190 in Ewyas, Herefordshire, England.
  • Death: He died on May 4, 1265, at age ~75, in Evesham, Worcester, England.
  • Note: Baron Tregoze of Lydiard Tregoze Lord of Ewyas Harold killed in battle

    Sir Robert de Tregoze, eldest son and heir, succeeded his father in his immense Wiltshire and Hereford estates, and was Baron Tregoze of Lydiard Tregoze in former county and Lord of Ewyas Harold in the latter, in right of his mother. He did homage and had livery of his mother's estates in Hereford, 1236, paying œ100 for his relief. He was living 40th of Henry III, 1256, and two years afterward was summoned to march against the Welsh, but in joining the rebellious barons of this reign, the same year was slain at the Battle of Evesham, Aug. 4, 1265, having had to wife Juliana, daughter William, Lord Catilupe by Millicent, daughter of Hugh de Gournai. Which Juliana brought the manor of Great Dodington in Northampton into the Tregoze family and bore her husband two children. By Roll of Arms compiled between 1240 and 1245 we find that Robert bore "Gules 3 bars gemels or, a lion passant in the chief of the same. They had Lucy and John. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 445.)

Juliana de Cantilupe

F, b. circa 1192, d. August 6, 1285

Parents

Family: Robert II de Tregoz (b. 1190, d. May 4, 1265)

Biography

  • Birth: Juliana de Cantilupe was born circa 1192 in Ewyas, Herefordshire, England.
  • Death: She died on August 6, 1285.

John de Mohun

M, b. circa 1227

Parents

Family: Joane de Ferrers (b. circa 1228, d. 1267)

Biography

  • Birth: John de Mohun was born circa 1227 in Dunster, Somerset, England.

Christina Segrave

F, b. circa 1300, d. 1341

Parents

Family: John de Mohun (b. circa 1300)

Biography

  • Birth: Christina Segrave was born circa 1300 in Segrave, Leicestershire, England.
  • Death: She died in 1341.
  • Note: 2nd son of Ralph de Someri and his wife Philippa Basset, son of John de Someri and his wife Hawise, daughter of Gervase Paganel and Isabel de Bellomont, daughter of Robert de Bellomont, Earl of Leicester. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 732)

    Roger de Someri, 2nd son, had livery of the Barony of Dudley, on the death of his nephew in 1229. He married 1st Nichola, daughter of William de Albina, surety for the Magna Charta, and had four daughters--Joan, Mable, Maud and Margaret. He married 2nd Amabel, daughter of Sir Robert de Chacombe. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 286)

    Roger de Somery died in 1273. The writ for the inquisition on his death is dated August 26, and shows that he held lands of his own inheritance in nine counties of England, and also, of the inheritance of his first wife, Nicola de Albini, the manor of Barrow-on-Soar, Leicestershire, and that of Campden in Gloucestershire. The lands of his own inheritance descended, of course, to his eldest son Roger, issue of his second wife, Amabel de Chaucombe, while those of Nicola de Albini were divided among her four daughters. (Le Strange Records, page 159.)

John de Mohun

M, b. circa 1249, d. June 11, 1279

Parents

Family: Eleanor Fitzpiers (b. circa 1250)

Biography

  • Birth: John de Mohun was born circa 1249 in Dunster, Somerset, England.
  • Death: He died on June 11, 1279.

Joan Burghersh

F, b. circa 1324, d. October 4, 1404

Parents

Family: John de Mohun (b. circa 1320, d. September 15, 1375)

Biography

  • Birth: Joan Burghersh was born circa 1324 in Burghersh, Sussex, England.
  • Death: She died on October 4, 1404.

John de Mohun

M, b. circa 1269, d. August 25, 1330

Parents

Family: Ada Tiptoft (b. circa 1283)

Biography

  • Birth: John de Mohun was born circa 1269 in Dunster, Somerset, England.
  • Death: He died on August 25, 1330.

Ada Tiptoft

F, b. circa 1283

Parents

Family: John de Mohun (b. circa 1269, d. August 25, 1330)

Biography

  • Birth: Ada Tiptoft was born circa 1283 in Prochester, Nottinghamshire, England.