Little Chute Historical Society

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Person Page 5,973

Algitha

F, b. circa 1040

Family: Aelfred Taillebois (b. circa 1040)

Biography

  • Birth: Algitha was born circa 1040.

Ivo of Taillebois

M, b. 1036, d. 1094

Parents

Family: Lucy Mallett (b. circa 1042)

Biography

  • Birth: Ivo of Taillebois was born in 1036 in Calvados, Normandie, France.
  • Death: He died in 1094, at age ~58, in Kendal, Cumbria, England.
  • Note: Earl of Angean

    Ivo Taillebois (1036 – 1094) was a powerful Norman nobleman in 11th Century England. He was the third son of Renfrid Taillibois C 1019, of Normandy, whose issue was as follows:

    I. Ralph Taillebois, Viscount of Bedford. II. William Taillebois, of Lincoln. III. Ivo Taillebois IV. Gilbert Fitz Renfrid. The name Taillebose or Taillebois, signifies "Woodcutter." He was among the followers of Duke William of Normandy who invaded England in 1066. He shared in the distribution of lands among the French Barons, and received the Barony of Kendal as his allotment of the spoils. It consisted of a large portion of Northern Lancashire and Southern Westmorland. He also held the Barony of Lincolnshire and Norfolk. He married Lucia, Daughter of Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia and grand-daughter of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, by whom he received all the ancient domains of the family Ælfgar, thus making him one of the most influential nobles in England in his day. Lucia was a sister to Edwin and Morcar, Earl of Northumbria, Dukes of Mercia and Northumberland, also a sister to Ealdyth, who married Harold, King of England.

    Ivo de Taillebois 1036 - 1094, created First Baron of Kendal by William the Conqueror. He is an ancestor of William Lancaster who is one of the earliest known users of the surname Lancaster. (Wikipedia)

    Taillefer (Latin Incisor-ferri, both meaning 'hewer of iron') was the surname of a Norman ioglere (juggler or jester) whose exact name and place of birth are unknown (sometimes his first name is given as "Ivo"). He travelled to England during the Norman Invasion of 1066, in the train of William the Conqueror. At the Battle of Hastings Taillefer recited the Chanson de Roland to the Norman troops while juggling with his sword. An English soldier ran out to challenge him and was killed by Taillefer, who then charged the English lines and was engulfed. Strangely, Taillefer is not depicted, by name at least, on the Bayeux tapestry. (Wikipedia.)

Lucy Mallett

F, b. circa 1042

Parents

Family: Ivo of Taillebois (b. 1036, d. 1094)

Biography

  • Birth: Lucy Mallett was born circa 1042 in Normandy, France.

Renfrid Taillibois

M, b. circa 1019

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Renfrid Taillibois was born circa 1019 in Normandy, France.
  • Note: The name Taillebose or Taillebois, signifies "Woodcutter."

Robert De Quincy

M, b. circa 1210, d. 1257

Parents

Family: Elen Verch Llywelyn (b. circa 1206, d. 1253)

Biography

  • Birth: Robert De Quincy was born circa 1210.
  • Death: He died in 1257.

Elen Verch Llywelyn

F, b. circa 1206, d. 1253

Parents

Family: Robert De Quincy (b. circa 1210, d. 1257)

Biography

  • Birth: Elen Verch Llywelyn was born circa 1206 in Wales, United Kingdom.
  • Death: She died in 1253.
  • Note: Elen ferch Llywelyn (c.1207–1253), his only certainly legitimate daughter, first married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester. This marriage was childless, and after John's death Elen married Sir Robert de Quincy, the brother of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester.

    Elen ferch Llywelyn (c. 1206 - 1253) was the daughter of Llywelyn the Great of Gwynedd in north Wales. The records of Llywelyn's family are confusing, and it is not certain which of his children were illegitimate, but Elen appears to have been his legitimate daughter by Joan, illegitimate daughter of King John of England. Elen married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester, in about 1222. He died aged thirty in 1237, and she re-married, her second husband being Sir Robert de Quincy. Their daughter, Hawise, was married to Baldwin Wake, Lord Wake of Lidel. Baldwin’s grand daughter, Margaret, was the mother of Joan of Kent, later Princess of Wales.

    There is also a record of a "Helen" daughter of "Llywelyn of Wales" who married Mormaer Maol Choluim II, Earl of Fife and later married Domhnall I, Earl of Mar. The dates appear to rule out this being Elen, since Maol Chaluim II did not die until 1266 while Elen's death is recorded in 1253. Some genealogists propose the existence of another Elen, an illegitimate daughter born towards the end of Llywelyn's life, but there is no clear evidence for this. Another possibility is that this Helen might have been an illegitimate daughter of Llywelyn the Last born when he was a young man, but there is also no evidence of the theory being true. (Wikipedia.)

Richard Fitzalan

M, b. 1307, d. January 24, 1376

Parents

Family: Eleanor Plantagenet (b. September 11, 1318, d. November 11, 1372)

Biography

  • Birth: Richard Fitzalan was born in 1307 in Arundel Castle, West Sussex, England.
  • Marriage: He and Eleanor Plantagenet were married on February 5, 1344 in Buckingham, England.
  • Death: Richard Fitzalan died on January 24, 1376, at age ~69, in Arundel Castle, West Sussex, England.
  • Note: 4th Earl of Surrey

    Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan He was the son of Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice Warenne. His birthdate is uncertain, but was not before 1307. Around 1321 Richard's father allied with king Edward II's favorites the Despensers, and Richard was married to Isabella, daughter of the younger Hugh le Despenser. Fortune turned against the Despenser party, and in 1326 Richard's father was executed, and Richard did not succeed to his father's estates or titles. However by 1330 political conditions had changed, and over the next few years Richard was gradually able to reaquire the earldom of Arundel as well as the great estates his father had held in Sussex and in the Welsh Marches. Beyond this, in 1334 he was made justice of North Wales (later his term in this office was made for life), sheriff for life of Carnarvonshire, and governor of Carnarvon Castle. Despite his high offices in Wales, in the following decades Arundel spent much of his time fighting in Scotland and France. In 1337 he was joint commander of the English army in the north, and the next year he was made the sole commander. In 1340 he fought at the Battle of Sluys, and then at the siege of Tournai. After a short term as warden of the Scottish Marches, he returned to the continent, where he fought in a number of campaigns, and was appointed joint Lieutanant of Aquitaine in 1340. Arundel was one of the three principal English commanders at the Battle of Crecy. He spent much of the following years on various military campaigns and diplomatic missions. In 1353 he succeeded to the Earldom of Surrey (or Warenne), which even further increased his great wealth. (He did not however use the additional title until after the death of the dowager countess of Surrey in 1361.) He made very large loans to Edward III but even so on his death left behind a great sum in hard cash. Arundel married twice. His first wife (as mentioned above), was Isabella Despenser. He repudiated her, and had the marriage annulled on the grounds that he had never freely consented to it. After the annullment he married Eleanor of Lancaster, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Leicester. By his first marriage he had one daughter. By the second he had 3 sons: Richard, who succeeded him as earl; John, who was a Marshall of England, and drowned in 1379; and Thomas Arundel, who became Archbishop of Canterbury. He also had 2 surviving daughters by his second wife: Joan, who married Humphrey de Bohun, earl of Hereford, and Alice, who married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

    Richard Earl of Arundel, by his will dated December 5, 1375, left 'to my nephews and nieces, sons and daughters of Sir Roger le Strange, and to my sister, Dame Alaine le Strange, wife to the said Roger, MD marks, over and above M marks more paid to them already.' (Le Strange Records, page 332.)

Edmund Fitzalan

M, b. May 1, 1285, d. November 17, 1326

Parents

Family: Alice de Warenne (b. June 15, 1287, d. May 23, 1338)

Biography

  • Birth: Edmund Fitzalan was born on May 1, 1285 in Marlborough, Devonshire, England.
  • Marriage: He and Alice de Warenne were married in 1305 in Arundel, Sussex, England.
  • Death: Edmund Fitzalan died on November 17, 1326, at age 41.
  • Note: Knight of the Bath He was the son of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alisona of Saluzzo, and succeeded to his father's estates and titles in 1302. Arundel bore the royal robes at Edward II's coronation, but he soon fell out with the king's favorite Piers Gaveston. In 1310 he was one of the Lords Ordainer, and he was one of the 5 earls who allied in 1312 to oust de Gaveston. Arundel resisted reconciling with the king after de Gaveston's death, and in 1314 he along with some other earls refused to help the king's Scottish campaign, which contributed in part to the English defeat at Bannockburn. A few years later Arundel allied with king Edward's new favorites, Hugh le Despenser and his son of the same name, and had his son and heir Richard married to a daughter of the younger Hugh le Despenser. He reluctantly consented to the Despenser's banishment in 1321, and joined the king's efforts to restore them in 1321. Over the following years Arundel was one of the king's principal supporters, and after the capture of Roger Mortimer in 1322 he received a large part of the forfeited Mortimer estates. He also held the two great offices governing Wales, becoming justice of Wales in 1322 and warden of the Welsh marches in 1325. After Mortimer's escape from prison and invasion of England in 1326, amongst the barons only Arundel and his brother-in-law Warenne remained loyal to the king. Their defensive efforts were ineffective, and Arundel was captured and executed at the behest of queen Isabella. Arundel married Alice, sister and eventual heiress of John de Warenne, 8th Earl of Surrey or Warenne. His estates and titles were forfeited when was executed, but they were eventually restored to his eldest son Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Alice de Warenne

F, b. June 15, 1287, d. May 23, 1338

Parents

Family: Edmund Fitzalan (b. May 1, 1285, d. November 17, 1326)

Biography

  • Birth: Alice de Warenne was born on June 15, 1287 in Warren, Sussex, England.
  • Marriage: She and Edmund Fitzalan were married in 1305 in Arundel, Sussex, England.
  • Death: Alice de Warenne died on May 23, 1338, at age 50, in Arundel, Sussex, England.

William de Warrenne

M, b. 1256, d. December 15, 1285

Parents

Family: Joan de Vere (b. 1264, d. November 23, 1293)

Biography

  • Birth: William de Warrenne was born in 1256 in Warren, Sussex, England.
  • Death: He died on December 15, 1285, at age ~29, in Croydon, England.
  • Note: He was accidentally killed at a tournament on December 15, 1286; his son John succeeded his grandfather as earl of Surrey. (Wikipedia)

    He was the son of John, son of William, son of Isabel and Hameline Plantagenet; daughter of William; son of William and Isabel Vermandois; son of William, Earl of Warrenne, in Normandy, and Gundred, daughter of William the Conqueror. Joan de Vere and William de Warren had, beside a daughter Alice. wife of Edmund FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel, a posthumous son, John. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 179.)

Joan de Vere

F, b. 1264, d. November 23, 1293

Parents

Family: William de Warrenne (b. 1256, d. December 15, 1285)

Biography

  • Birth: Joan de Vere was born in 1264 in Oxfordshire, England.
  • Death: She died on November 23, 1293, at age ~29.
  • Note: Joan de Vere married William de Warren, who died in the lifetime of his father, Dec. 15, 1286. (He was the son of John Plantagenet de Warren and Lady Alice le Brun; daughter of Lady Isabel de Taillefer, died 1246, widow of King John, and Hugh le Brun, Earl of March; daughter of Lady Alice de Courtenay and Aymer de Taillefer, Count of Angouleme in France; daughter of Peter of France and Lady Alice, daughter of Sir Reginald de Courtney; son of Louis VI, King of France.) This William de Warren; son of John Warren and Alice le Brun; son of William de Warren and Maud Mareschal; son of Isabella de Warren and Hameline Plantagenet; daughter of William de Warren and Ala de Talvas; son of William de Warren and Isabel de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus, First Cusader; son of Henry I, King of France, and his wife, Anne of Russia; son of William de Warren and Gundreda, daughter of William, the Conqueror, King of England. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 994.)

John le Strange

M, b. May 20, 1444, d. October 16, 1479

Parents

Family: Jacquette Woodville (b. circa 1444, d. 1509)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born on May 20, 1444.
  • Death: He died on October 16, 1479, at age 35.
  • Note: The inquisition on the death of his father shows that John le Strange was born on May 20, 1444, and was five years of age when he succeeded as eighth Lord Strange of Knockin and fourth Lord Mohun de Dunster. He was summoned to Parliament from February 28, 1467, to August 19, 1472, and the Rolls contain proof of his sitting. Even during his minority his name was included in letters sent by King Henry VI to the lords spiritual and temporal requiring them to attend Parliament. Before he was eighteen years of age he was placed in the Commission of the Peace and of Array for Middlesex, viz. on December 4, 1461, as 'John Straunge of Straunge, knight' and on September 21, 1462, a licence was issued for 'John, lord le Strange, son and heir of Elizabeth [Cobham] le Strange, deceased, late the wife of Richard, lord le Strange, knight, deceased, who is nearly of full age, to enter into all his possessions in England and Wales, and the Marches of Wales. From the beginning of his career he was a pronounced Yorkist. He was made a knight by bathing at the coronation of Edward IV on June 28, 1461, and was one of the peers who took the oath of allegiance to Edward, Prince of Wales, as son and heir-apparent, at Westminster, on July 3, 1471. His name appears repeatedly between 1466 and 1479 in Commissions of the Peace, of Array, and of Oyer and Terminer for the counties of Salop, Warwick, Middlesex, and Oxford; and he was appointed one of the Triers of Petitions in 1472. John le Strange married Jacquetta, or Jacinta, sister of Elizabeth, Queen Consort of Edward IV, fourth daughter of Richard Wydville, first Earl Rivers, by Jacquetta, Dowager Duchess of Bedford, daughter of Peter de Luxembourg, Count of St. Pol and Conversan. John Lord Strange died without male issue on October 16, 1479, leaving as his heiress an only daughter, Joan, who, thirty years later, caused to be erected in Hillingdon Church, Middlesex, a marble tombstone with a brass to the memory of her father and mother. The inscription no longer remains, but has been preserved by Weever, and was existing when he wrote in 1631. (Le Strange Records, page 344-345.)

Jacquette Woodville

F, b. circa 1444, d. 1509

Parents

Family: John le Strange (b. May 20, 1444, d. October 16, 1479)

Biography

  • Birth: Jacquette Woodville was born circa 1444.
  • Death: She died in 1509.

Richard le Strange

M, b. circa 1381, d. August 9, 1449

Parents

Family: Elizabeth Cobham (b. circa 1380, d. December 10, 1453)

Biography

  • Birth: Richard le Strange was born circa 1381.
  • Death: He died on August 9, 1449.
  • Note: Richard, seventh Lord Strange of Knockin, was a boy of sixteen when he succeeded his father on July 28, 1397, and he held the title for fifty-two years. The custody of him and his lands had originally been given by the King to Edward, Earl of Rutland, who granted it to Thomas, Earl of Worcester, and another to the use of Maud (de Mohun), Richard's mother. She shortly afterwards married Sir Nicholas Hauberk, but died on September 20, 1400; on February 12 King Henry IV confirmed to Hauberk the custody of the young lord of Knockin, on his undertaking to pay for it the sum of 400 marks into the Exchequer. During the summer of 1403 the Ellesmere tenants of Richard, who was not yet of full age, were involved by his steward, John Kynaston, in the conspiracy of the Percies and Glyndwr to restore Richard, if alive, or, if he were really deceased, to place the Earl of March upon the throne. It appears, from a pardon afterwards granted to the tenants, that Kynaston, under pretext of bringing them to the King, led them to Middle, where they did not find their lord. They would have withdrawn, but Kynaston threatened to behead and draw and hang them, and forced them ignorantly to go to the place where Henry Percy was, and there detained them. Hotspur was defeated and slain near Shrewsbury on July 23, and on August 13 a pardon was issued by Henry IV to the Ellesmere tenants. Richard made proof of age on August 16, 1404. The inquisition taken thereon mentions that he was born at London, in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less, in the ward of Bradstrete, and baptized in the same church on August 1, 1381. He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Strange de Knockin from August 25, 1404, to January 2, 1449, and the Rolls contain proof of his sitting. His name appears among those present in Parliament as witnesses to the two patents for settling the Crown on Henry IV and his four sons. Richard Lord Strange was twice married. He must have married his first wife about the year 1408, to Joan, damsel, daughter of the lord le Grey, of the dioceses of Lichfield and Lincoln. On Easter Day, 1417, Lord Strange killed Sir Thomas Trussell in a brawl in the church of St. Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 'excited thereto,' according to Fabian's 'Chronicle,' 'by the Devil, and the evil disposition of their wives'. (Le Strange Records, page 339-341.)

Elizabeth Cobham

F, b. circa 1380, d. December 10, 1453

Parents

Family: Richard le Strange (b. circa 1381, d. August 9, 1449)

Biography

  • Birth: Elizabeth Cobham was born circa 1380.
  • Death: She died on December 10, 1453.
  • Note: The second wife of Richard Lord Strange was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Reginald Cobham of Sterborough Castle. The marriage must have taken place very shortly after the death of his first wife Constance, whose will was dated March 8, 1439; as on August 26 following Richard had a licence to entail Ness, Ellesmere, and other manors on the issue of himself and his wife Elizabeth; by her he had a son and heir, John, who succeeded him. The Inquisitions p.m. on Richard show that he died on August 9, 1449, and that his wife Elizabeth survived him. She died four years later, on December 10, 1453. (Le Strange Records, page 342.)

John le Strange

M, b. circa 1350, d. July 28, 1397

Parents

Family: Maude de Mohun (b. circa 1357, d. September 20, 1400)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born circa 1350.
  • Death: He died on July 28, 1397.
  • Note: He was thirty years old at his father's death; an inquisition 'ad Quod Dampnum' of May 28, 1372, in the Record Office, shows that he was knighted and also that he was married before that date. The jury found that there was no reason why Roger le Strange, knight, of Knockin, should not grant his manor of Avington, Berks, to his son John le Strange, knight, and Maud his wife and their heirs. Maud was the third and youngest daughter, and eventual heiress of John, second Baron Mohun de Dunster. The covenant for his marriage settlement was dated at London on June 17, 1369, and is sealed with a cross engrailed by John de Mohun. He was placed on the Commission of the Peace for Salop on December 21, 1382; and, on April 29, 1385, on the commission of Array, in view of the imminent invasion by the French. His mother, Aleyne fitz Alan, was still alive in 1385, as a pardon was granted on June 25 of that year 'to Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Alina Lestrange, mother of John Lestrange, Lord of Knokyn, Joan de Mohun, and Ebulo Lestrange, clerk, to whom the said John le Strange granted a yearly rent of œ70 from his lands in Flint, held of the King in chief, and who entered thereon without licence.' By a charter dated July 8, 1385, John le Strange, lord of Knockin, granted to Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey, to Aleyne le Strange his mother, and to Ebulo le Strange, clerk, his brother, the manor of Holborn, in the suburb of London, in fee, with remainder to the heirs of Alice. He was summoned to Parliament from August 20, 1283, to July 18, 1397. He was in the garrison of Berwick, and served in the Scotch wars. The inquisition on the death of John le Strange shows that he died on July 28, 1397, and that on his wife, Maud de Mohun, shows that she survived for three years, and died on September 20, 1400. (Le Strange Records, page 335-337.)

Maude de Mohun

F, b. circa 1357, d. September 20, 1400

Parents

Family: John le Strange (b. circa 1350, d. July 28, 1397)

Biography

  • Birth: Maude de Mohun was born circa 1357 in Dunster, Somerset, England.
  • Death: She died on September 20, 1400.
  • Note: On the death of John, Lord Mohun de Dunster, in 1375-6, that barony had fallen into abeyance among his daughters; of these the eldest, Elizabeth, Countess of Salisbury, died without issue in 1415; the second, Philippa, Duchess of York, also died without issue in 1431, while the third, Maud, widow of John, sixth Lord Strange of Knockin, had died before 1401; so, on the death of Philippa, Richard le Strange, as representing his mother, Maud, became sole heir to his maternal grandfather, and succeeded to the barony of Mohun de Dunster, which from this period followed the descent of that of Strange of Knockin, until both passed into the family of Stanley. (Le Strange Records, page 342.)

Roger le Strange

M, b. 1326, d. August 23, 1382

Parents

Family: Alaine Fitzalan (b. 1314, d. January 20, 1386)

Biography

  • Birth: Roger le Strange was born in 1326 in Knockin, Shropshire, England.
  • Death: He died on August 23, 1382, at age ~56, in Wales, United Kingdom.
  • Note: Roger, fifth Lord Strange of Knockin, though only twenty-three when he succeeded his father, had already seen four years of foreign service in Flanders and at the siege of Calais. He married, about 1350, Aleyne, daughter of his feudal lord, Edmund fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel, and Alice, sister, and in her issue, sole heiress of John, Earl of Warenne and Surrey. Roger was placed on a commission with Sir John Charlton, on March 12, 1351, to make inquisition touching those who had made counterfeit money at Shrewsbury, and to bring them before the council with their dies and other instruments which had been found in the river Severn. On March 20, 1361, we find Roger in the Commission of the Peace for Salop, and, on February 10, 1367, he was placed on the Commission of Array for the same county: these appointments were repeated for many subsequent years. He was summoned to Parliament from September 20, 1355, to August 9, 1382, and the Rolls of Parliament contain proof of his sittings. The Lord of Knockin seems to have been kept pretty busy in providing for the preservation of the King's peace on the Welsh March. He was bidden on his allegiance, on February 10, 1367, to cause a set number of fencible men to be chosen, furnished according to their estate with competent arms, to march when danger threatens; and there are many similar orders to be found in the Rolls. Richard Earl of Arundel, by his will dated December 5, 1375, left 'to my nephews and nieces, sons and daughters of Sir Roger le Strange, and to my sister, Dame Alaine le Strange, wife to the said Roger, MD marks, over and above M marks more paid to them already.' This will shows that Roger and Aleyne had several younger children. (Le Strange Records, page 330-332.)

Alaine Fitzalan

F, b. 1314, d. January 20, 1386

Parents

Family: Roger le Strange (b. 1326, d. August 23, 1382)

Biography

  • Birth: Alaine Fitzalan was born in 1314 in Arundel, Sussex, England.
  • Death: She died on January 20, 1386, at age ~72, in Knockin, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: Aleyne, daughter of his feudal lord, Edmund fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel, and Alice, sister, and in her issue, sole heiress of John, Earl of Warenne and Surrey. The inquisition on the death of Roger le Strange shows that he died on August 23, 1382, leaving as heir his son John, aged thirty, and that he and his wife Aleyne held the following: in London, a large tenement with a garden in Holborn; in Middlesex, the manor of Colham, and certain rents, with a fair and markets in the manor of Uxbridge; in Lincolnshire, the manor of Halton; in Bucks, two water-mills under one roof, in Denham on the bank of the Colne; in Oxfordshire, the manors of Middleton and Bicester; in Cambridgeshire, the manor of Middleton; in Staffordshire, the manor of Shenston; and in Salop and the March of Wales, the manors of Ellesmere with its hamlets, of Strange Ness, of Kinton, and the castle of Knockin with its demesne. His wife, Aleyne fitz Alan, survived him. (Le Strange Records, page 331-333.)

Roger le Strange

M, b. August 15, 1301, d. July 29, 1349

Parents

Family: Maud (b. circa 1300)

Biography

  • Birth: Roger le Strange was born on August 15, 1301 in Knockin, Shropshire, England.
  • Death: He died on July 29, 1349, at age 47, in Sedgbrook, Lincolnshire, England.
  • Note: Roger was nearly twenty-three when he succeeded his brother. He had already begun active service, as the Patent Rolls show that he had letters of protection on January 15, 1322, while staying with Peter de Monteforti in the Marches of Wales on the King's service. He too followed the family tradition of enlarging the possessions of their favourite abbey; between 1223 and 1225 he quitclaimed to Haughmond all his right to Thorneford Mill and the fishery of Bassmere, in Middle, which his father had formerly mortgaged to the abbey. On August 9, 1328, Roger released to the abbey the vivary or mill of Wilcott, and on the same day confirmed to it his father's charter of the chapel of Knockin, and his father's release of the rent of two wethers (multones) payable at Caldecote. On May 12, 1342, he had a licence for the alienation in mortmain to the abbot and convent of the advowson of Hanmer; as 'Seigneur de Knokyn et d'Ellesmere' he made an ample confirmation on June 5, 1343, of the rights of the abbot within the lordship of Ellesmer On the death of his uncle, Eubulo le Strange, in 1335, Roger succeeded to such property as Eubulo held in his own right, but not to that which he held in right of his wife Alice, who survived him. It is difficult to make out, from the inquest on Eubulo, exactly which lands passed to Roger, but he certainly inherited a messuage in Holborn, and licence was granted on September 27, 1336, to Hugh de Freyne and Alice his wife (Eubulo's widow), whom he had just married, to settle the castle of Clifford, and the manors of Glasbury, Colham, Edgware, &c., with remainder to Roger le Strange of Knockin and his heirs.

    Roger Lord Strange held the office of steward to Richard, Earl of Arundel, who had succeeded to the vast estates of the family of Warenne on the death of his maternal uncle, John, Earl of Surrey and Sussex. In 1342, after the French had burnt Portsmouth and threatened Southampton, Roger was summoned to be at Portsmouth with ten men-at-arms and twenty archers, ready to sail for France. He was summoned to Parliament from February 25, 1342, to March 10, 1348. The name of Roger le Strange of Knockin appears among those of the great lords who displayed their banners during the campaign of Crecy in 1346, and the French Roll of 21 Edward III states that he was of the retinue of the Earl of Lancaster, and had with him William de Chetewynde of Shavington; on August 10, 1347, i.e. a week after the surrender of Calais, 'Roger Lestraunge of Knokyn the elder' is mentioned in the Roll as having letters of protection; apparently he had fallen ill before this, and sent for his son Roger to supply his place, as an entry in the Memoranda Roll of the King's Remembrancer of 26 Edward III, which exonerates him from assessment on his lands for finding men-at-arms, &c., mentions that, having been detained by grievous bodily infirmity, he had sent his son 'Roger Lestraunge the younger,' who had served in the King's retinue until the King's return to England. Eyton, in his le Strange pedigree, erroneously makes Joan the first wife, and Maud the second wife of Roger le Strange; but it is clear that Joan de Ingham was the second wife, as she survived him and married again. She was dowered on September 24, 1349, with a third part of the fortalice and hundred of Ellesmere, assigned to her by the King out of the lands of her late husband Roger, and the lands of her own inheritance which they had held jointly were ordered to be restored to her. (Le Strange Records, page 326-328.)

Maud

F, b. circa 1300

Family: Roger le Strange (b. August 15, 1301, d. July 29, 1349)

Biography

  • Birth: Maud was born circa 1300.

John le Strange

M, b. May 18, 1282

Parents

Family: Isolda of Walton (b. 1284)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born on May 18, 1282 in Ellesmere, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: The Shropshire inquisition on the death of John le Strange (V), taken on September 20, 1309, states that his son and heir, John, was then aged twenty-seven, and was born on May 18, 1282. He only survived his father for about eighteen months, but that short period sufficed for him to execute the important series of documents, the evidences of which will be set out in extenso, by virtue of which the Hunstanton estate was vested in his younger brother Hamon, who, on his part, counter-claimed Knockin to John. During his father's lifetime John, son of John le Strange, was employed on the King's service in the Scotch wars; it was perhaps this which obliged him to borrow 20s. on December 12, 1308, from Adam de Osgodby, a prominent Chancery clerk under Edward II, which sum was to be levied in default on his lands in the county of Stafford. John, the father, had been ordered a few days before his death to raise a hundred foot-soldiers from Knockin for service against the Scots; Edward II had other matters requiring his attention, so a truce was patched up with Scotland, and, on September 11, the custodian of the lands of John le Strange of Knockin was notified that the hundred men would not be wanted. The escheator had been directed on September 8, 1309, to take into the King's hands the lands late of John le Strange of Knockin, deceased, tenant-in-chief; a month later, on October 6, the same official was ordered to deliver the said lands to John, son and heir of John le Strange, he having done homage; saving to Maud, late the wife of John, her dower.

    John made use of the instrumentality or trusteeship of his brother to effect an entail of Knockin on the heirs of himself and his wife Isolda, and this will account for the finding of the inquest on his death that he and Isolda had acquired that manor from Hamon. The same arrangement was also made with regard to Melverley, part of le Strange's feoffment under fitz Alan. Immediately after his father's death John le Strange (VI) was summoned, by writ dated at York on October 26, 1309, to attend the Parliament to be held there on February 8 following. In the autumn of 1310 Edward invaded Scotland, and John le Strange was one of the barons summoned to the muster at Berwick on September 8. John le Strange (VI) must have died early in 1311, probably during the month of January; the writ of 'Diem clausit extremum' upon his death is tested at Berwick-upon-Tweed, February 6, 1311. (Le Strange Records, page 255-264.)

Isolda of Walton

F, b. 1284

Family: John le Strange (b. May 18, 1282)

Biography

  • Birth: Isolda of Walton was born in 1284 in Ellesmere, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: Before the death of his father John (VI) had married a lady of the name of Isolda or Yseult, but who she was has not been recorded, though she was of sufficient importance to have been enfeoffed jointly with her husband in Knockin and other estates. Their first act after succeeding to them was the settlement of the Shropshire and Norfolk properties. The escheator beyond Trent was ordered, on March 30, 1311, to deliver to Isolda, late the wife of John le Strange of Knockin, a tenant-in-chief, the manor of Knockin, and the town of Milverlegh, co. Salop, together with the issues of the same, taken into the King's hands on the death of the said John, as it appears by inquisition that he and Isolda acquired the same jointly from Hamo Lestraunge, and that the manor is held of Thomas de Halgton by homage, and the said town from Edmund Earl of Arundel by service of 10s. yearly, and that the said John and Isolda held the same jointly at the time of John's death. Two days later, namely, on April 1, 1311, the same escheator was further directed to assign to Isolda dower of her late husband's lands in the presence of John of Knockin, to whom the King had granted the custody of two parts of the said John Lestraunge's lands during the minority of his heir, if the said John de Knockin choose to attend, the said Isolda having taken oath before the King not to marry again without his licence.

    is nothing to show that Isolda ever remarried after the death of her husband. During the year 1314 she was involved in some legal controversy arising out of her husband's will; on May 7 Nicholas Daumary, executor of that will, appointed attorneys to receive in Chancery the 300 marks that Thomas, son of John Hastang, and John, son of Robert de Felton, had acknowledged to him in Chancery in 1309-10. Isolda's name occurs on August 8, 1316, as being required to furnish a jury from her lands to determine a complaint as to the forest of Ellesmere. A deed was dated at London on December 2, 1317, and bears a memorandum that Isoude came into Chancery on the same day, and acknowledged the above deed. Isolda survived certainly until 1324, as is shown by writs directed to her as Lady of Knockin, but the necessities of the war with Scotland rendered it desirable that the command of the castle should not be vested in a woman. The last writ directed to Isolda was dated May 20, 1324, requiring her to furnish from her liberty a jury to try the case of Griffith de la Pole of Powys. (Le Strange Records, page 256, 265-269.)

John le Strange

M, b. 1254, d. October 7, 1309

Parents

Family: Maud de Eiville (b. circa 1255)

Biography

  • Birth: John le Strange was born in 1254 in Ellesmere, Shropshire, England.
  • Death: He died on October 7, 1309, at age ~55, in Walton, Warwickshire, England.
  • Note: The Shropshire and Norfolk inquisitions show that John le Strange (V) was twenty-two years of age when his father was accidentally drowned in the Severn in the autumn of 1275, though it was not until May of the following year that he obtained seisin of his father's lands, and did homage for them to the King. Of his three uncles, Hamon, the crusader, had died two years before in the Holy Land; Robert, also a crusader, had returned home, but died a few months later, in 1276, leaving three sons, John, Fulk, and Robert, the second of whom was eventually the first baron of the house of Blackmere. The only uncle left alive was Roger le Strange of Ellesmere. Like his father and his grandfather, John (V) was a benefactor to the Shropshire Abbey of Haughmond. One of his earliest acts, after coming into possession of his lands, being to grant to that abbey rents in Kinton to the value of 40d. He was twice married; of his first wife, who apparently had no children, nothing but the Christian name, Alianora, has come down to us; this is mentioned in a curious exchange, entered on the Plea Rolls at Trinity, 127 John's second wife was Maud, daughter and heiress of Roger d'Eiville, of Walton d'Eiville, Warwickshire, in right of whom he held that manor, which afterwards passed to their heir. Maud survived her husband. The services of John le Strange in the first Welsh war were recognised by a grant from the King, dated January 10, 1278, remitting œ200, wherein he was bound at the Exchequer for the debts of John his father and his ancestors, 'as the King has pardoned him this sum for his grateful service.' On February 5 the King wrote a warm letter of thanks to him for the spontaneous services which he had rendered over and above those due from him by his feudal tenure. (Le Strange Records, page 185-190.)

Maud de Eiville

F, b. circa 1255

Family: John le Strange (b. 1254, d. October 7, 1309)

Biography

  • Birth: Maud de Eiville was born circa 1255.