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Baldwin IV of Hainault

M, b. 1108, d. November 8, 1171

Parents

Family: Alice of Namur (b. 1110, d. July 1, 1168)

Biography

  • Birth: Baldwin IV of Hainault was born in 1108 in Hainaut, Walloon, Belgium.
  • Death: He died on November 8, 1171, at age ~63.

Alice of Namur

F, b. 1110, d. July 1, 1168

Parents

Family: Baldwin IV of Hainault (b. 1108, d. November 8, 1171)

Biography

  • Birth: Alice of Namur was born in 1110 in Namur, Belgium.
  • Death: She died on July 1, 1168, at age ~58.

Thierry II "The Valiant" of Lorraine

M, b. circa 1050, d. May 8, 1115

Parents

Family 1: Hedwig of Formbach (b. circa 1050)

Family 2: Gertrude of Flanders (b. 1080, d. 1117)

Biography

  • Birth: Thierry II "The Valiant" of Lorraine was born circa 1050 in Lorraine, France.
  • Marriage: He and Hedwig of Formbach were married in 1075.
  • Marriage: Thierry II "The Valiant" of Lorraine and Gertrude of Flanders were married in 1096.
  • Death: Thierry II "The Valiant" of Lorraine died on May 8, 1115 in Chatenois, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Note: Thierry II (died 1115), called the Valiant, was the duke of Lorraine from 1070 to his death. He was the son and successor of Gerhard and Hedwige de Namur. He is sometimes numbered Thierry I if the dukes of the House of Ardennes, who ruled in Upper Lorraine from 959 to 1033, are ignored in favour of the dukes of Lower Lorraine as predecessors of the later dukes of Lorraine.

    In fact, Sophia, the daughter of Duke Frederick II of the House of Ardennes, who had inherited the counties of Bar and Montbéliard, had a husband named Louis, who contested the succession. In order to receive the support of his brother, he gave him the county of Vaudémont and convened an assembly of nobles, who elected him duke over Louis. Soon Louis was dead, but his son, Thierry II of Bar, claimed the succession anyway. However, Emperor Henry IV confirmed Thierry the Valiant in the duchy. Probably for this reason, Thierry remained faithful to the emperors throughout his rule. He fought the Saxons while they were at war with the Emperor between 1070 and 1078 and he opposed the popes Gregory VII and Urban II when they were in conflict with the Emperor.

    In 1095, he planned to take up the Cross (i.e., go on Crusade, specifically the First), but his ill health provoked him to drop out, nevertheless convincing his barons to go east. Thereafter, he took little part in imperial affairs, preferring not to intervene between Henry IV and his son Henry, or against Lothair of Supplinburg, duke of Saxony, who was his son's wife's brother. His married his first wife, Hedwige (d.1085 or 1090), daughter of Frederick, count of Formbach, around 1075. He married his second wife, Gertrude (1080-1117), daughter of Robert I of Flanders and Gertrude of Saxony. (Wikipedia.)

Sibylle of Anjou

F, b. 1112, d. 1165

Parents

Family: Thierry of Alsace (b. circa 1099, d. February 4, 1168)

Biography

  • Birth: Sibylle of Anjou was born in 1112 in Anjou, Tours, Touraine, France.
  • Death: She died in 1165, at age ~53, in Bethlehem, Judea.
  • Note: Sibylla of Anjou (c. 1112-1165) was a daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine, and wife of William Clito and Thierry, Count of Flanders.

    In 1123 Sibylla married to William Clito, son of the Norman Robert Curthose and future Count of Flanders. Sibylla brought the County of Maine to this marriage, which was annulled in 1124 on grounds of consanguinity. The annulment was made by Pope Honorius II upon request from Henry I of England, William's brother; Fulk opposed it and did not consent until Honorius excommunicated him and placed an interdict over Anjou. Sibylla then accompanied her widower father to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, where he married Melisende, the heiress of the kingdom, and became king himself in 1131. In 1139 she married Thierry of Alsace, the new Count of Flanders, who had arrived on his first pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

    She returned to Flanders with her new husband, and during his absence on the Second Crusade the pregnant Sibylla acted as regent of the county. Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut took the opportunity to attack Flanders, but Sibylla led a counter-attack and pillaged Hainaut. In response Baldwin ravaged Artois. The archbishop of Reims intervened and a truce was signed, but Thierry took vengeance on Baldwin when he returned in 1149.

    In 1157 she travelled with Thierry on his third pilgrimage, but after arriving in Jerusalem she separated from her husband and refused to return home with him. She became a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany, where her step-aunt, Ioveta of Bethany, was abbess. Ioveta and Sibylla supported Queen Melisende and held some influence over the church, and supported the election of Amalric of Nesle as Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem over a number of other candidates. Sibylla died in Bethany in 1165.

    With Thierry she had six children. (Wikipedia.)

Thierry of Alsace

M, b. circa 1099, d. February 4, 1168

Parents

Family: Sibylle of Anjou (b. 1112, d. 1165)

Biography

  • Birth: Thierry of Alsace was born circa 1099 in Alsace-Lorraine, France.
  • Death: He died on February 4, 1168 in Flanders, Nord, France.
  • Note: Dierik, was count of Flanders from 1128 to 1168. He was the youngest son of Duke Thierry II of Lorraine and Gertrude of Flanders. After the murder of Charles the Good, Derrick was one the claimants for the county. Due to the support of King Louis VI of France, William Clito became count instead. Derrick succeeded after William's death in 1128. His first wife, Suanhilde, died in 1133, leaving an only daughter, Laurette. Laurette of Flanders married four times: (1) Ivan, Count of Alost; (2) Henry II, Duke of Limburg; (3) Raoul I, Count of Vermandois; and (4) Henry I, Count of Luxembourg. Laurette finally retired to a nunnery, where she died in 1170. Derrick secondly married Sibylle of Anjou, the former wife of William Clito. He was a noted Crusader, having undertaken four pilgrimages between 1139 to 1164. In 1139 he fought alongside his father-in-law Fulk V of Anjou at the invasion of Gilead. Afterwards he joined the Second Crusade, fighting at the Battle of Attalia in 1148. Later that year he joined the assembly of King Baldwin III of Jerusalem at Acre. In 1164 he accompanied King Amalric I of Jerusalem to Antioch and Tripoli. (Wikipedia.)

Gertrude of Flanders

F, b. 1080, d. 1117

Parents

Family: Thierry II "The Valiant" of Lorraine (b. circa 1050, d. May 8, 1115)

Biography

Mathilde de Mortaigne

F, b. circa 1030

Parents

Family: Baldwin VI Of Flanders (b. circa 1030, d. July 17, 1070)

Biography

  • Birth: Mathilde de Mortaigne was born circa 1030.

Conrad I of Luxembourg

M, b. circa 1040, d. August 8, 1086

Parents

Family: Clemence De Poitou (b. circa 1052)

Biography

  • Birth: Conrad I of Luxembourg was born circa 1040 in Luxembourg.
  • Marriage: He and Clemence De Poitou were married.
  • Death: Conrad I of Luxembourg died on August 8, 1086.

Ermenside of Luxembourg

F, b. circa 1082, d. June 24, 1143

Parents

Family: Godfrey of Namur (b. 1063, d. August 19, 1139)

Biography

  • Birth: Ermenside of Luxembourg was born circa 1082.
  • Death: She died on June 24, 1143 in Belgium.
  • Note: Legend has is that it all started when Robert, the young Duke of Normandy saw Herleva washing in the river near his castle. He was unable to resist her and took her for his mistress. She later gave birth to his son, William in 1027 or 1028. Their love affair didn't last. While Robert went on a pilgrimage, Herleva married Herluin de Conteville in 1029. From this marriage she had two sons: Odo and Robert, who both became prominent during William's reign. They also had at least one daughter, who married William, lord of La Fert-Mac. William the Conqueror had a (half or full) sister, Adelaide, who may have been Herleva's daughter, but could possibly have been a daughter of Robert by some other mistress. Adelaide married first Enguerrand, count of Ponthieu, second Lambert of Lens, and third Odo, count of Champagne. duplicate lineHerleva, the daughter of a tanner did not marry.

Giselbert of Luxembourg

M, b. 1059, d. August 14, 1058

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Giselbert of Luxembourg was born in 1059 in Luxembourg.
  • Death: He died on August 14, 1058, at age ~-1.

Robert I of Flanders

M, b. circa 1033, d. October 13, 1093

Parents

Family: Gertrude of Saxony (b. circa 1030, d. August 4, 1113)

Biography

  • Birth: Robert I of Flanders was born circa 1033.
  • Marriage: He and Gertrude of Saxony were married in 1063.
  • Death: Robert I of Flanders died on October 13, 1093.
  • Note: Robert The Frisian, French Robert Le Frison, DutchRobrechtDeFries He was the younger son of Baldwin V of Flanders and Adela (Alix) Capet, a daughter of King Robert II of France. Robert was originally intended to secure the northern borders of Flanders by his marriage to Gertrude of Holland, but after his brother's death in 1070 he displaced his nephews and became count of Flanders. By Gertrude of Holland he had 5 children. (Wikipedia) Upon his marriage, Robert's father had also invested him with Imperial Flanders, including the islands of Frisiawestof the Scheldt . He thus in his own right and that of his step son was ruler of all Frisia (Zeeland) and thus became known among his Flemish countrymen as Robert the Frisia (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Otto I Graf von Rheineck

M, b. 1077, d. 1150

Parents

Family: Gertrude von Northeim (b. 1079, d. 1165)

Biography

  • Birth: Otto I Graf von Rheineck was born in 1077 in Luxembourg.
  • Marriage: He and Gertrude von Northeim were married in 1115 in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.
  • Death: Otto I Graf von Rheineck died in 1150, at age ~73, in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.

Alfonso VIII "the Noble" Sanchez

M, b. November 11, 1155, d. October 5, 1214

Parents

Family: Eleanor of England (b. October 13, 1162, d. October 31, 1214)

Biography

  • Birth: Alfonso VIII "the Noble" Sanchez was born on November 11, 1155 in Castile, Burgos, Castilla-Leon, Spain.
  • Marriage: He and Eleanor of England were married on September 22, 1177 in Burgos, Burgos, Spain.
  • Death: Alfonso VIII "the Noble" Sanchez died on October 5, 1214, at age 58, in Gutierre Munoz, Avila, Castile.
  • Note: Grandson of Alfonso VII, is a great name in Spanish history, for he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohades at the battle of the Navas de Tolosa in 1212. His personal history is that of many medieval kings. He succeeded to the throne, in infancy, on the death of his father, Sancho. Though proclaimed king, he was regarded as a mere name by the unruly nobles to whom a minority was convenient. The devotion of a squire of his household, who carried him on the pommel of his saddle to the stronghold of San Esteban de Gormaz, saved him from falling into the hands of the contending factions of Castro and Lara, or of his uncle Ferdinand of Len, who claimed the regency. The loyalty of the town of lvila protected his youth. He was barely fifteen when he came forth to do a man's work by restoring his kingdom to order. It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo from the hands of the Laras. His marriage with Leonora of Aquitaine, daughter of Henry II of England, brought him under the influence of the greatest governing intellect of his time. Alfonso VIII was the founder of the first Spanish university, the studium generale of Palencia, which, however, did not survive him. During his reign, Castile annexed the province of Logroo. In 1176, Alfonso married Eleonor Plantagenet, daughter of King Henry II of England and his wife Eleonor of Aquitaine. They had 12 children (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)Grandson of Alfonso VII, is a great name in Spanish history, for he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohades at the battle of the Navas de Tolosa in 1212. His personal history is that of many medieval kings. He succeeded to the throne, in infancy, on the death of his father, Sancho. Though proclaimed king, he was regarded as a mere name by the unruly nobles to whom a minority was convenient. The devotion of a squire of his household, who carried him on the pommel of his saddle to the stronghold of San Esteban de Gormaz, saved him from falling into the hands of the contending factions of Castro and Lara, or of his uncle Ferdinand of Len, who claimed the regency. The loyalty of the town of lvila protected his youth. He was barely fifteen when he came forth to do a man's work by restoring his kingdom to order. It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo from the hands of the Laras. His marriage with Leonora of Aquitaine, daughter of Henry II of England, brought him under the influence of the greatest governing intellect of his time. Alfonso VIII was the founder of the first Spanish university, the studium generale of Palencia, which, however, did not survive him. During his reign, Castile annexed the province of Logroo.

Eleanor of England

F, b. October 13, 1162, d. October 31, 1214

Parents

Family: Alfonso VIII "the Noble" Sanchez (b. November 11, 1155, d. October 5, 1214)

Biography

  • Birth: Eleanor of England was born on October 13, 1162 in Domfront, France.
  • Marriage: She and Alfonso VIII "the Noble" Sanchez were married on September 22, 1177 in Burgos, Burgos, Spain.
  • Death: Eleanor of England died on October 31, 1214, at age 52, in Burgos, Burgos, Spain.
  • Note: She was born in Domfront Castle, Normandy. She was the seventh child and second daughter of King Henry II of England and his wife Queen Alienor. Her godfather was the chronicler Robert of Torigny, who had a special interest in her and recorded her life as best he could. She received her first name as namesake of her mother, who apparentöy was the first Alienor (Eleanor) ever. Eleanor was a younger maternal half-sister of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France. She was a younger sister of William, Count of Poitiers, Henry the Young King, Matilda of England, Richard I of England and Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany. She was also an older sister of Joan Plantagenet and John of England. When she was eight years old, in 1170, she was married to King Alfonso VIII of Castile. The marriage was arranged to secure the Pyrennean border, with Gascony offered as her dowry. They had 12 children. Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughters, her namesake Eleanor (who was called Leonor by her Spanish subjects) best inherited her mother's political influence. She reigned alongside her husband, who specified in his will that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berenguela to the king of Leon in the interest of peace. When Alfonso died, his queen was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their daughter Berenguela instead performed these honors. Leonora then took sick and died only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at Abbey de las Huelgas, in Burgos. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Sancho III "The Desired" of Castile

M, b. 1134, d. August 30, 1158

Parents

Family: Blanca of Navarre (b. circa 1133, d. August 12, 1156)

Biography

  • Birth: Sancho III "The Desired" of Castile was born in 1134 in Toledo, Toledo, Spain.
  • Marriage: He and Blanca of Navarre were married on January 30, 1151.
  • Death: Sancho III "The Desired" of Castile died on August 30, 1158, at age ~24, in Toledo, Toledo, Spain.
  • Note: He was the eldest son of King Alfonso VII of Castile and Berenguela of Barcelona. His father's will partitioned the kingdom between his two sons: Sancho inherited Castile, and Fernando inherited Leon. The two brothers had just signed a treaty before Sancho's sudden death in the summer of 1158. He left an only son and heir, Alfonso VIII of Castile, by his wife Blanca of Navarre. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Blanca of Navarre

F, b. circa 1133, d. August 12, 1156

Parents

Family: Sancho III "The Desired" of Castile (b. 1134, d. August 30, 1158)

Biography

  • Birth: Blanca of Navarre was born circa 1133 in Pamplona, Navarre, Spain.
  • Marriage: She and Sancho III "The Desired" of Castile were married on January 30, 1151.
  • Death: Blanca of Navarre died on August 12, 1156.
  • Note: Blanca married Sancho III of Castile "el Deseado" (the Beloved), co-king of Castile (with his father) on January 30, 1151 in Catahorra, Logroño; however, she died before her husband's accession as sole ruler in 1157. She had several children who did not survive and are buried in the church of San Pedro in Soria. On November 11, 1155 she gave birth to the future king Alfonso VIII. There appears to be no record of her activities thereafter, except for her death on August 12, 1156. While it had been suggested that she might have died from the complications of a new pregnancy, Valdez maintains that she died from sequelae of the birth of her son. That her death was caused by a pregnancy is recorded in an epitaph. Sancho donated money to the monastery of Santa María la Real in Najera where she is buried. The sarcophagus of the queen is regarded as a primary example of the ability to express artistically human emotions in the 12th century. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Garcia VI "The Restorer" of Navarre

M, b. circa 1100, d. November 21, 1150

Parents

Family: Marguerite de L'Aigle of Rotrou (b. circa 1100)

Biography

  • Birth: Garcia VI "The Restorer" of Navarre was born circa 1100.
  • Death: He died on November 21, 1150 in Lorca, Spain.
  • Note: García VI Ramírez (Garsias Ranimiriz, also García IV, because he was only the fourth García of the Jiménez dynasty; died 21 November 1150, Lorca), called the Restorer (Spanish: el Restaurador), was Lord of Monzón and Logroño, and, from 1134, King of Navarre. He "restored" the independence of the Navarrese crown after 58 years of union with the Kingdom of Aragon.

    García was born in the early twelfth century, the grandson of Rodrigo Díaz, better known as El Cid. His father was Ramiro Sánchez of Monzón, a son of Sancho Garcés, illegitimate son of García V of Navarre and half-brother of Sancho IV. His mother was Cristina Rodríguez Díaz de Vivar, the Cid's daughter.

    When Aragon, which had from 1076 been united to Navarre, lost its warrior king Alfonso the Battler and fell into a succession crisis in 1134, García managed to wrest Navarre from his likewise illegitimate Aragonese cousins. He was elected in Pamplona by the bishops and nobles of the realm against the will of Alfonso. That Alfonso, in drawing up a will, had ignored his distant relation (of an illegitimate line), is not unsurprising given the circumstances. Alfonso had nearer male kin in the form of his (also illegitimate) brother Ramiro. Besides that, since Alfonso seems to have disregarded Ramiro as well, the choice of an illegitimate descendant of Sancho the Great would undoubtedly have aroused the opposition of the Papacy to the succession.

    Ramiro did succeed Alfonso in Aragon, because the nobles refused to enact the late king's unusual will. His accession did raise protest from Rome and was not uncontested within Aragon, much less in Navarre, where García was the chosen candidate once the testament of Alfonso was laid aside. Rome does not seem to have opposed him, but neither does he seem to have had much support within Aragon, while Ramiro strongly objected to his election in Navarre. In light of this, the Bishop of Pamplona granted García his church's treasure to fund his government against Ramiro's pretensions. Among Garcías other early supporters were Lop Ennechones, Martinus de Leit, and Count Latro, who carried out negotiations on the king's behalf with Ramiro. Eventually, however, the two monarchs reached a mutual accord — the Pact of Vadoluongo — of "adoption" in January 1135: García was deemed the "son" and Ramiro the "father" in an attempt to maintain both the independence of each kingdom and the de facto supremacy of the Aragonese one.

    In May 1135, García declared himself a vassal of Alfonso VII. This simultaneously put him under the protection and lordship of Castile and bought recognition of his royal status from Alfonso, who was a claimant to the Battler's succession. García's submission to Castile has been seen as an act of protection for Navarre which had the consequence of putting her in an offensive alliance against Aragon, which thus forced Ramiro to marry, to forge an alliance with Raymond Berengar IV of Barcelona and to produce an heir, now that García, his adoptive son, was out of the question. On the other hand, García may have been responding to Ramiro's marriage, which proved beyond a doubt that the king of Aragon was seeking another heir than his distant relative and adopted son.

    Before September 1135, Alfonso VII granted García Zaragoza as a fief. Recently conquered from Aragon, this outpost of Castilian authority in the east was clearly beyond the military capacity of Alfonso to control and provided further reasons for recognition of García in Navarre in return for not only his homage, but his holding Zaragoza on behalf of Castile. In 1136, Alfons was forced to do homage for Zaragoza to Ramiro and to recognise him as King of Zaragoza. In 1137, Zaragoza was surrendered to Raymond Berengar, though Alfonso retained suzerainty over it. By then, García's reign in Zaragoza had closed.

    Sometime after 1130, but before his succession, García married Marguerite de l'Aigle. She was to bear him a son and successor, Sancho VI, as well as two daughters who each married kings: the elder, Blanca, born after 1133, married Sancho III of Castile, while the younger, Margaret, named after her mother, married William I of Sicily. García's relationship with his first queen was, however, shaky. She took on many lovers and showed favouritism to her French relatives. She bore a second son named Rodrigo, whom her husband refused to recognise as his own.[8] On 24 June 1144, in León, García married Urraca, illegitimate daughter of Alfonso VII and Guntroda Pérez, to strengthen his relationship with his overlord.

    In 1136, García was obliged to surrender Rioja to Castile but, in 1137, he allied with Alfonso I of Portugal and confronted Alfonso VII. They confirmed a peace between 1139 and 1140. He was thereafter an ally of Castile in the Reconquista and was instrumental in the conquest of Almería in 1147. In 1146, he occupied Tauste, which belonged to Aragon, and Alfonso VII intervened to mediate a peace between the two kingdoms.

    By his marriage to Urraca, García had also become a brother-in-law of Raymond Berengar IV, with whom he confirmed a peace treaty in 1149. The count was promised to García's daughter Blanca while already engaged to Petronilla of Aragon, but García died before the marriage could be carried out.

    García died on 12 November 1150 in Lorca, near Estella, and was buried in the cathedral of Santa María in Pamplona. He was succeeded by his eldest son. He left one daughter by Urraca: Sancha, who married Gaston V of Béarn. He left a widow in the person of his third wife, Ganfreda López. García left, as the primary monument of his reign, the monastery of Sant María de La Oliva in Carcastillo. It is a fine example of Romanesque architecture. (Wikipedia.)

Marguerite de L'Aigle of Rotrou

F, b. circa 1100

Family: Garcia VI "The Restorer" of Navarre (b. circa 1100, d. November 21, 1150)

Biography

  • Birth: Marguerite de L'Aigle of Rotrou was born circa 1100.

Ramiro Sanchez of Monzon

M, b. 1070, d. 1116

Parents

Family: Christina Rodriguez Dias de Vivar (b. circa 1070)

Biography

  • Birth: Ramiro Sanchez of Monzon was born in 1070 in Moncon, Spain.
  • Death: He died in 1116, at age ~46.

Christina Rodriguez Dias de Vivar

F, b. circa 1070

Parents

Family: Ramiro Sanchez of Monzon (b. 1070, d. 1116)

Biography

  • Birth: Christina Rodriguez Dias de Vivar was born circa 1070.

Sancho Garces

M, b. circa 1040

Parents

Family: Constanza de Maranon (b. circa 1040)

Biography

  • Birth: Sancho Garces was born circa 1040.

Constanza de Maranon

F, b. circa 1040

Family: Sancho Garces (b. circa 1040)

Biography

  • Birth: Constanza de Maranon was born circa 1040.

Garcia V of Navarre

M, b. circa 1010, d. September 15, 1054

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Garcia V of Navarre was born circa 1010.
  • Death: He died on September 15, 1054 in Castile, Burgos, Castilla-Leon, Spain.
  • Note: King of Navarre He was the second eldest legitimate son and heir of Sancho the Great, thus he succeeded in his father's inheritance of Navarre. However, his father divided his many conquests among García's brothers: Ramiro, the eldest but illegitimate son, received the petty kingdom of Aragón; Ferdinand, the eldest legitimate son, received Castile (which his father received through marriage to his mother) and a sort of "High Kingship"; and his youngest surviving son (legitimate), Gonzalo, received the kingdoms of Sobrarbe and Ribagorza. In 1037, Ferdinand requested García's aid against his brother-in-law, Bermudo III of León, in battle near Pisuerga. The two brothers defeated Bermudo, who died in battle, the final descendant of Pedro de Cantabria, and Ferdinand succeeded in León. By aiding Ferdinand, García received his brother's favour and, in a repartition of Castile, he expanded Navarre to the bay of Santander and incorporating the entire Basque Country. Soon he was confronted by his brother Ramiro at Tafalla (1043) and defeated him. He was one of the Christian kings to profit greatly from the weakened taifa kingdoms inhabiting the vacuum that was the Caliphate of Córdoba. In 1045, he conquered Calahorra. Relations eventually soured with Ferdinand and war broke out between the fraternal kingdoms, García dying in the Battle of Atapuerca, 15 September, 1054. His nickname comes from is foundation of the Monastery of Santa María de Nájera in 1052. He was married, in 1038, to Estefanía de Foix, daughter of the count of Barcelona (her dowry was the Cameros), and they produced ten children (five sons, five daughters) He also had a bastard son, Ramiro. He is sometimes number García III because he was the third of his dynasty (Jiménez). (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar

M, b. circa 1040, d. July 10, 1099

Parents

Family: Jimena of Oviedo (b. circa 1040)

Biography

  • Birth: Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar was born circa 1040 in Vivar, Burgos, Spain.
  • Marriage: He and Jimena of Oviedo were married in July 1074.
  • Death: Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar died on July 10, 1099 in Valencia, Spain.
  • Note: He was a Castilian military and political leader in medieval Spain. Born of the Spanish nobility, El Cid was educated in the royal Castilian court and became an important general and administrator, fighting against the Moors in the early Reconquista. Later exiled by King Alfonso VI, El Cid left service in Castile and worked as a mercenary-general for other rulers, both Moor and Christian. Late in life, El Cid captured the Mediterranean coastal city of Valencia, ruling it until his death in 1099. "El Cid Campeador" is a compound of two separate sobriquets. The "El Cid" is derived from the word al-sidi in the Andalusi Arabic dialect (from the Arabic sayyid—"sir" or "lord", a title of respect) while the title el campeador (the champion) was granted by his Christian admirers. These titles reflected the great esteem El Cid had among both Moors and Christians, as well as his fighting ability; Henry Edwards Watts wrote that el campeador "[m]eans in Spanish something more special than "champion" ... A campeador was a man who had fought and beaten the select fighting-man of the opposite side in the presence of the two armies." "El Cid" was pronounced /el tsið/ (IPA) in medieval Castilian, but /el ?ið/ in modern standard Spanish (the c like the th in "thin" and the d like the th in "then".) The exact date of the El Cid's birth is unknown. Based on his participation in 1063 at the Battle of Graus, however, most historians believe that El Cid was born between 1043 and 1045, in Vivar (Bivar), a small town about six miles north of Burgos, the capital of Castile. Historical records show that El Cid's father was Diego Laínez, who was part minor nobility (infanzones) of Castile. Diego Laínez was a courtier, bureaucrat, and cavalryman who had fought in several battles. Despite the fact in later years the peasants would consider him one of their own, El Cid's mother's family was aristocratic. However, his relatives were not major court officials: documents show that El Cid's paternal grandfather, Lain Nuñez, only confirmed five documents of Ferdinand I's; his maternal grandfather, Rodrigo Alvarez, certified only two of Sancho II's; the Cid's own father confirmed only one. This seems to indicate that El Cid's family was not comprised of major court officials. One well-known legend about the Cid describes how he acquired his famous war-horse, the white stallion Babieca. According to this story, Rodrigo's godfather, Pedro El Grande, was a monk at a Carthusian monastery. Pedro's coming-of-age gift to El Cid was his pick of a horse from an Andalusian herd. El Cid picked a horse that his godfather thought was a weak, poor choice causing the monk to exclaim "Babieca!" (stupid!) Hence, it became the name of El Cid's horse. Today, Babieca appears in multiple works about the Cid. El Cid was educated in the Castilian royal court, serving the prince and future king Sancho II, the son of King Ferdinand I ("the Great"). When Ferdinand died in 1065, he had continued his father's goal of enlarging his territory, conquering the Christian and the Moorish cities of Zamora and Badajoz. On July 10, 1099, the Cid passed away in his home. Though his wife Jimena would continue to rule for two more years, an Almoravid siege forced Jimena to seek help from Alfonso. They could not hold the city but both managed to escape. Alfonso ordered the city burned to prevent it from falling into the hands of the Moors. Valencia was captured by Masdali on May 5, 1109 and would not become a Christian city again for over 125 years. Jimena fled to Burgos with the Cid's body. Originally buried in Castile in the monastery of San Pedro de Cardeña, his body now lies at the center of the impressive cathedral of Burgos. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Jimena of Oviedo

F, b. circa 1040

Family: Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar (b. circa 1040, d. July 10, 1099)

Biography

  • Birth: Jimena of Oviedo was born circa 1040.
  • Marriage: She and Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar were married in July 1074.