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Person Page 5,959

Guarine de Meer

M, b. 1130

Family: Melette Peverel (b. circa 1130)

Biography

  • Birth: Guarine de Meer was born in 1130 in Whittington, Shropshire, England.
  • Note: Guarine de Meer, a member of the House of Lorraine, in France, was among the first persons of note to whom William, the Conqueror, committed the defense of the Marches toward Wales. (In the 8th century the word marche (French) meant a boundary between two countries or districts, and the earliest Mark or March districts were tracts of land on the border of the Carolingian Empire. Wherever Charlemagne pushed forward the frontiers of the Frankish realm he established Mark districts, and the oversight of these was entrusted to special officers called margraves. In England in the same connection the plural Marches was the form commonly adopted, and soon after the Norman Conquest the disturbed districts on the border of Wales began to be known as the Welsh Marches. Lands therein were granted to powerful nobles on condition that they undertook the defense of the neighboring counties of England. The Mortimers were created Earls of March from this term.) Guarine de Meer received custody of Adderbury, County Salop, and Alestoun, County Gloucester, of which former county Guarine was sheriff in the year 1083, and he was at that time one of the chief advisors and councillors of Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury. Of this Guarine it is stated that, having heard that William, a valiant knight, sister's son to Pain Peverell, Lord of Whittington, in Shropshire, had two daughters, one of whom named Mallet had resolved to marry none but a knight of great prowess; and that her father had appointed a meeting of noble young, at Peverel's Place on the Pike, from which she was to select the most gallant; Guarine came hither; when entering the lists with a son of the King of Scotland, and with a Baron of Burgundy, he vanquished them both, and won the fair prize with the lordship of Whittington, which descended to later FitzWarins for several hundred years. At this place he subsequently took up his abode, and founded the Abbey of Adderbury. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 484)

    Warin de Metz married the Peverel heiress, Melette, and thus gains the lordship of Whittington. (Fouke le Fitz Waryn, Edited by Stephen Knight and Thomas H. Ohlgren, Originally Published in Robin Hood and Other Outlaw Tales, Kalamazoo, Michigan: Medieval Institute Publications.)

Melette Peverel

F, b. circa 1130

Family: Guarine de Meer (b. 1130)

Biography

  • Birth: Melette Peverel was born circa 1130.

William de Ros

M, b. 1255, d. 1317

Parents

Family: Maud de Vaux (b. 1275)

Biography

  • Birth: William de Ros was born in 1255 in Hamlake, Yorkshire, England.
  • Marriage: He and Maud de Vaux were married in 1287.
  • Death: William de Ros died in 1317, at age ~62.
  • Note: Was a claimant to the crown of Scotland, in 1292, during the reign of Edward I, and was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward I and Edward II. He succeeded to the family honours and estates on the death of his mother. He was an unsuccessful competitor for the crown of Scotland, founding his claim on his descent from his great grandmother, Isabel, daughter of William I of Scotland. He was buried at Kirkham Priory. His wife was Maud or Matilda de Vaux (b. 1275), whom he married in 1287. Through this marriage the patronage of Penteney and Blakeney Priories in Norfolk and of Frestun in Lincolnshire, came into the De Ros family. Their children were Margaret de Ros and William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

    William de Roos, 7th Baron Roos, born 1255, was summoned to Parliament as Baron Roos of Hamlake from June 23, 1295, to Oct. 5, 1315. This nobleman was one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland in the 19th of Edward I, 1296, through his grandmother, Isabel, natural daughter of William the Lion, King of Scotland. He was subsequently engaged in the wars of Gascony and Scotland, and discovering the intention of his kinsman, Robert de Roos, then Lord of Werke, to deliver up the Castle to the Scots, he lost no time in apprising the king, who thereupon dispatched him with 1,000 men to defend that place, but the Scots attacking this force upon its march cut it to pieces. When Edward I, himself advancing from New Castle-Upon-Tyne, soon obtained possession of the fort and appointed Lord Roos its Governor, allowing him during his absence in Gascony to nominate his brother Robert, his Lieutenant. In a short time, after he had a grant of this castle, with its appurtenances, forfeited by the treason of his before-mentioned kinsman, and for several subsequent years, his lordship was actively engaged in Scotland. He married Maud, or Matilda, one of the daughters and co-heirs of John de Vaux, who brought him the Manor of Fenton and lands in Boston in County Lincoln. He had three sons, William, his successor, John, Thomas, and three daughters, Margaret, Anne and Mary. His lordship died in 1316. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 758.)

Maud de Vaux

F, b. 1275

Parents

Family: William de Ros (b. 1255, d. 1317)

Biography

  • Birth: Maud de Vaux was born in 1275.
  • Marriage: She and William de Ros were married in 1287.

Robert de Ros

M, b. 1223, d. May 13, 1285

Parents

Family: Isabel D'Aubigny (b. 1223, d. June 15, 1301)

Biography

  • Birth: Robert de Ros was born in 1223 in Belvior, Leicestershire, England.
  • Marriage: He and Isabel D'Aubigny were married on January 3, 1242.
  • Death: Robert de Ros died on May 13, 1285, at age ~62, in Kirkham, Yorkshire, England.
  • Note: 1st Baron de Ros Was an English nobleman and the first holder of the ancient title Baron de Ros. He was summoned to Parliament in 1264, during the reign of Henry III. Married to Isabel, rich heiress of William Albini IV, he obtained from Henry III, July 3,1257, a grant of the free warren, in the lordship of Belvoir, by which the boundary was determined. In 1258, he was actively employed in Scotland, in delivering Alexander III out of the hands of his rebellious subjects; and at Chester, in resisting the hostile invasions of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales. In the same year, he and his lady Isabel had a controversy with the Prior and Convent of Belvoir, relative to the right of presentation to the Church of Redmile (near Bottesford), which was amicably compromised by their relinquishing the patronage to the convent, for a certain compensation. In 1261 he obtained from the king the grant of a weekly market, to be held at Belvoir, on Tuesday; and of an annual fair on the feast of St John the Baptist, to continue for three days. In 1264, he was one of the insurgent barons who defeated Henry III at the battle of Lewes, and took him and the prince prisoner, whom they confined in Hungerford Castle. In 1264, he was summoned to the parliament, which was called by the barons in the king's name. He died in 1285, and was buried at Kirkham. de Ros Married to Isabel, rich heiress of William Albini IV, he obtained from Henry III, July 3,1257, a grant of the free warren, in the lordship of Belvoir, by which the boundary was determined. In 1258, he was actively employed in Scotland, in delivering Alexander III out of the hands of his rebellious subjects; and at Chester, in resisting the hostile invasions of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales. In the same year, he and his lady Isabel had a controversy with the Prior and Convent of Belvoir, relative to the right of presentation to the Church of Redmile (near Bottesford), which was amicably compromised by their relinquishing the patronage to the convent, for a certain compensation. In 1261 he obtained from the king the grant of a weekly market, to be held at Belvoir, on Tuesday; and of an annual fair on the feast of St John the Baptist, to continue for three days. In 1264, he was one of the insurgent barons who defeated Henry III at the battle of Lewes, and took him and the prince prisoner, whom they confined in Hungerford Castle. In 1264, he was summoned to the parliament, which was called by the barons in the king's name. He died in 1285, and was buried at Kirkham. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Isabel D'Aubigny

F, b. 1223, d. June 15, 1301

Parents

Family: Robert de Ros (b. 1223, d. May 13, 1285)

Biography

  • Birth: Isabel D'Aubigny was born in 1223.
  • Marriage: She and Robert de Ros were married on January 3, 1242.
  • Death: Isabel D'Aubigny died on June 15, 1301, at age ~78, in Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England.

Lucy Fitzpiers

F, b. circa 1242

Parents

Family: William II Lord of Hamlake De Ros (b. 1242, d. 1310)

Biography

  • Birth: Lucy Fitzpiers was born circa 1242.

Reginald Fitzpiers

M, b. circa 1215

Family: Alice Fitzrobert (b. circa 1215)

Biography

  • Birth: Reginald Fitzpiers was born circa 1215.

Alice Fitzrobert

F, b. circa 1215

Family: Reginald Fitzpiers (b. circa 1215)

Biography

  • Birth: Alice Fitzrobert was born circa 1215.

William D'Aubigny

M, b. circa 1190, d. 1247

Parents

Family: Albreda Biseth (b. circa 1190)

Biography

  • Birth: William D'Aubigny was born circa 1190 in Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England.
  • Death: He died in 1247.

Albreda Biseth

F, b. circa 1190

Parents

Family: William D'Aubigny (b. circa 1190, d. 1247)

Biography

  • Birth: Albreda Biseth was born circa 1190.

William D'Aubigny

M, b. circa 1146, d. May 1, 1236

Parents

Family: Margery of Umfraville (b. circa 1152, d. 1208)

Biography

  • Birth: William D'Aubigny was born circa 1146 in Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England.
  • Death: He died on May 1, 1236 in Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England.
  • Note: William d'Aubigny was prominent during the baronial rebellions against King John. He stayed neutral at first, only joining the rebels after the early success in taking London in 1215. He was one of the 25 guaranteors of the Magna Carta. In the war that followed the signing of the charter, he held Rochester for the barons, and was imprisoned (and nearly hanged) after John captured the castle. He became a loyalist on the accession of Henry III, and was a commander at the Battle of Lincoln in 1217. He was succeeded by his son, another William D'Aubigny, who died in 1247 and left only daughters. One of the was Isabel, a co-heiress, who married Robert, Lord de Ros (c. 12123-1301), thus adding the Aubigny co-signer of the Magna Charta to the pedigree of George Washington, 1st president of the USA. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

    Celebrated William d'Albini, Surety for the Magna Carta, Lord of Belvoir Castle. He married 2nd Agatha de Trusbut, by whom he had no children, but by his 1st wife Margery, daughter of Odonel, Baron de Umfraville, he had Robert, Nicholas, Odonel, all of whom died without issue, and William. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 758)

    WILLIAM DE ALBINI, Lord of Belvoir, son and heir, was one of the rebel barons against King John and one of the twenty-five sureties elected to secure that King's performance of the Magna Charta; Governor of Rochester Castle; in favor with Henry III and a principal commander at the battle of Lincoln; married, first, Margery, daughter of Odonel de Umfraville; second, Agatha, daughter and co-heir of William Trusbut; died 20 Henry III. (Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 111-112.)

Margery of Umfraville

F, b. circa 1152, d. 1208

Parents

Family: William D'Aubigny (b. circa 1146, d. May 1, 1236)

Biography

  • Birth: Margery of Umfraville was born circa 1152 in Prudhoe Castle, Northumberland, England.
  • Death: She died in 1208 in Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England.

William Meschines D'Aubigny

M, b. circa 1132, d. 1167

Parents

Family: Maude Fitzrobert (b. circa 1132)

Biography

  • Birth: William Meschines D'Aubigny was born circa 1132.
  • Death: He died in 1167.

Maude Fitzrobert

F, b. circa 1132

Parents

Family: William Meschines D'Aubigny (b. circa 1132, d. 1167)

Biography

  • Birth: Maude Fitzrobert was born circa 1132 in Essex, England.

William D'Aubigny

M, b. circa 1086, d. 1155

Parents

Family: Cicily Bigod (b. 1100)

Biography

  • Birth: William D'Aubigny was born circa 1086 in Bretagne, Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France.
  • Death: He died in 1155.
  • Note: Lord of Belvoir "Brito" was an itinerant justice under Henry I. He fought at the Battle of Tinchebray. He acquired the honor of Belvoir, which became the center of the family estates, as marriage portion from his wife, Cecily, daughter of Roger Bigod. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) son of Main and Adelaide de Bohun (dau of Humphrey I)?

    William de Albini, called Brito, succeeded as the feudal lord of Belvoir Castle. For some reason unknown now he assumed the surname of Albini or d'Aubigny, and to distinguish him from a contemporary of the same name, who was ancestor of the Earls of Arundel, namely, William d'Albini, pincerna or rotal butler, our William became known as Brito, having been born in England. This William le Brito was at the time of his succession formally confirmed in the chapter house of St. Albans all the liberal grants of his parents to the Church of Our Lady at Belvoir, desiring that he might be admitted in the fraternity as those his parents had been. William d'Albini, Brito, died about 1155, leaving two sons, William, his heir, and Ralph d'Albini, 2nd son, founder of the House of Daubeny, and died at Acre in the Holy Land 1190. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 758.)

Cicily Bigod

F, b. 1100

Parents

Family: William D'Aubigny (b. circa 1086, d. 1155)

Biography

  • Birth: Cicily Bigod was born in 1100 in Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England.

Henry Biseth

M, b. circa 1175

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Henry Biseth was born circa 1175.

Robert Fitzrichard de Clare

M, b. circa 1064, d. 1134

Parents

Family: Maud De Senilis St Liz (b. 1093, d. 1140)

Biography

  • Birth: Robert Fitzrichard de Clare was born circa 1064 in Tunbridge, Kent, England.
  • Death: He died in 1134 in Essex, England.
  • Note: Robert FitzRichard, 5th son of Richard FitzGilbert, Earl of Clare, who was stewart to Henry I, and obtained from that monarch the barony of Dunmow in Essex, as also the honour of Baynard's Castle in the City of London, both of which came into the possession of the crown by the forfeiture of William Baynard. This Robert, who died 1134, married 1112 Maud de St. Liz, Lady of Branham, daughter of Simon St. Liz, 1st Earl of Huntingdon, and by her (who died in 1140 and married 2nd Saire de Quincey) had two sons, Walter, his successor, and Simon, to whom he gave Daventry in Northamptonshire. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 543.)

Adam Fraunceys

M, b. 1334

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Adam Fraunceys was born in 1334 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

John de Vaux

M, b. circa 1250, d. 1287

Family: Sibilla de Longchamps (b. circa 1250)

Biography

  • Birth: John de Vaux was born circa 1250.
  • Death: He died in 1287 in Walton, Lancashire, England.

Sibilla de Longchamps

F, b. circa 1250

Family: John de Vaux (b. circa 1250, d. 1287)

Biography

  • Birth: Sibilla de Longchamps was born circa 1250.

Thomas Holland

M, b. July 2, 1350, d. April 25, 1397

Parents

Family: Alice Fitzalan (b. May 2, 1352, d. March 17, 1416)

Biography

  • Birth: Thomas Holland was born on July 2, 1350 in Upholland, Lancashire, England.
  • Marriage: He and Alice Fitzalan were married on April 10, 1364 in Arundel, Sussex, England.
  • Death: Thomas Holland died on April 25, 1397, at age 46, in Woodstock, Kent, England.
  • Note: Baron de Holland Baron of Woodstock, Wake and Holland He was an English nobleman and a councilor of his half-brother Richard II. He was the son of Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent and Joan of Kent, daughter of Edmund of Woodstock and granddaughter of Edward I. After his father's death his mother married Edward the Black Prince. When his father died in 1360 he became Baron de Holland. His mother was still Countess of Kent in her own right. At sixteen, in 1366, Holland was appointed captain of the English forces in Aquitaine. He fought in various campaigns over the following years, and was made a Knight of the Garter in 1375. Richard II became king in 1377, and soon Holland acquired great influence over his younger half-brother. This influence, in most historians view, was utilized primarily for Holland's own enrichment. In 1381 he was created Earl of Kent. Holland married Alice Fitzalan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster. He was succeeded by their eldest son Thomas Holland, 1st Duke of Surrey. Their daughter Eleanor de Holland married Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March and became mother to Anne de Mortimer. (Wikipedia)

    Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, Baron of Woodstock, Wake and Holland, was engaged in the French wars in the immediate retinue of his stepfather, Edward, Prince of Wales, and gained distinction at the Battle of Castile. Upon the accession of his half brother, Richard II, his lordship obtained a grant of œ200 per annum out of the exchequer, and was constituted General Warden of all the forests south of Trent. In the ninth year of the same reign, at the decease of his mother, Joan, Princess of Wales, he had special livery of all the lands of her inheritance. His lordship married Alice FitzAlan, daughter of Richard FitzAlan, K. G., 9th Earl of Arundel, and his wife, Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl of Lancester, and Maud de Chaworth, son of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster and Blanche (daughter of Robert, son of Louis VIII, King of France), son of Henry III, King of England. They had two sons and six daughters: Thomas, d. s. p., and Edmund, who also died without legitimate issue. Daughters were Alinore, Margaret, Joane, Eleanor, Elizabeth, Bridget. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 384.)

Alice Fitzalan

F, b. May 2, 1352, d. March 17, 1416

Parents

Family: Thomas Holland (b. July 2, 1350, d. April 25, 1397)

Biography

  • Birth: Alice Fitzalan was born on May 2, 1352 in Arundel, Sussex, England.
  • Marriage: She and Thomas Holland were married on April 10, 1364 in Arundel, Sussex, England.
  • Death: Alice Fitzalan died on March 17, 1416, at age 63, in Woodstock, Kent, England.

Thomas Holland

M, b. August 5, 1314, d. December 27, 1360

Parents

Family: Joan (the Fair Maid) of Kent (b. September 29, 1328, d. August 8, 1385)

Biography

  • Birth: Thomas Holland was born on August 5, 1314 in Broughton, Buckinghamshire, England.
  • Marriage: He and Joan (the Fair Maid) of Kent were married in 1340.
  • Death: Thomas Holland died on December 27, 1360, at age 46, in Broughton, Buckinghamshire, England.
  • Note: Sir Thomas Holland, one of the original Knights of the Garter. He was in the wars of France from 14th to 20th of Edward III, 1340-1346, and in the last year commanded the van of Prince Edward's army at the famous Battle of Cressy, after which he was made Knight of the Garter and summoned to Parliament as a Baron. He was the son of Robert Holland and Maud le Zouch, daughter of Roger le Zouch and Ela de Longspee (great granddaughter of Henry II and Rosamund Clifford), son of Alan le Zouch and Elena de Quincy, daughter of Roger de Quincy, son of Saire de Quincy, Surety for the Magna Charta, and Margaret de Bellomont, daughter of Robert de Bellomont and Isabel de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh the Great, leader of the first Crusade, and Adelheid de Vermandois, son of Henry I, King of France, and Anne of Russia. Joan was born 1328, died 1385, married 2nd 1348. He died 1360. He had three sons, Thomas, successor to his father, Edmund and John and a daughter Maud. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 383-384)

    He was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years War. He was from a gentry family in Holland, Lancashire. In his early military career, he fought in Flanders. He was engaged, in 1340, in the English expedition into Flanders and sent, two years later, with Sir John D'Artevelle to Bayonne, to defend the Gascon frontier against the French. In 1343, he was again on service in France; and, in the following year, had the honour of being chosen one of the founders of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. In 1346, he attended King Edward III into Normandy in the immediate retinue of the Earl of Warwick; and, at the taking of Caen, the Count of Eu and Guînes, Constable of France, and the Count De Tancarville surrendered themselves to him as prisoners. At the Battle of Crécy, he was one of the principal commanders in the van under the Prince of Wales and he, afterwards, served at the Siege of Calais in 1346-7. Around the same time or before his first expedition, he married the 12-year-old princess Joan Plantagenet, Joan of Kent, daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret Wake, granddaughter of Edward I and Marguerite of France, and sole heir of her father. However, during his absence on foreign service, Joan, under pressure from her family, contracted another marriage with William Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (of whose household Holland had been seneschal). This second marriage was annulled in 1349, when Joan's previous marriage with Holland was proved to the satisfaction of the papal commissioners. Between 1353 and 1356 he was summoned to Parliament as Baron de Holland. In 1354 Holland was the king's lieutenant in Brittany during the minority of the Duke of Brittany, and in 1359 co-captain-general for all the English continental possessions. His brother-in-law John, Earl of Kent, died in 1360, and Holland became Earl of Kent in right of his wife. He was succeeded as baron by his son Thomas, the earldom still being held by his wife (though the son later became Earl in his own right). Another son, John became Earl of Huntingdon and Duke of Exeter. (Wikipedia.)