Little Chute Historical Society

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Person Page 5,946

Eleanor de Burgh

F, b. 1282

Parents

Family: Thomas of Multon (b. February 21, 1276, d. 1313)

Biography

  • Birth: Eleanor de Burgh was born in 1282 in Belfast, Ireland.

Thomas Multon

M, b. circa 1265, d. February 12, 1295

Parents

Family: Isabel (b. circa 1265)

Biography

  • Birth: Thomas Multon was born circa 1265.
  • Death: He died on February 12, 1295.

Isabel

F, b. circa 1265

Family: Thomas Multon (b. circa 1265, d. February 12, 1295)

Biography

  • Birth: Isabel was born circa 1265.

Thomas Multon

M, b. circa 1245

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Thomas Multon was born circa 1245.

Walter de Burgh

M, b. circa 1220, d. 1271

Parents

Family: Avelina Fitzjohn (b. circa 1232, d. 1274)

Biography

  • Birth: Walter de Burgh was born circa 1220 in Ulster, Ireland.
  • Death: He died in 1271 in Castle of Galway, Connacht, Ireland.
  • Note: Walter de Burgh, born about 1220 or after, died at his castle of Galway in 1271, buried at Athassel Priory, County Tipperary. He was 2nd Lord of Connaught and 1st Earl of Ulster. Second son of Richard Mor de Burgh. In 1243, he succeeded his father as Lord of Connacht, and was created Earl of Ulster as well in 1264. In 1270, he and Walter de Ufford, the Justiciar of Ireland, were defeated by Aedh mac Felim Ua Conchobair at Ath an Chip. Aedh and the O'Connors thereafter ruled independently in Roscommon as "kings of the Gael of Connacht".[1] Succeeded by his eldest son, Richard Og de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster (The Red Earl of Ulster). (Wikipedia)

    Walter de Burgh, Lord of Connaught, married Maud, daughter and heir of Hugh de Laci, Earl of Ulster, by Emmeline, his wife, daughter and heir of Walter de Ridlesford, Lord of Bray, and became in consequence the Earl of Ulster in her right at her father's decease in 1263, and in his own right in 1264. They had four sons: Richard, Theobald, William and Thomas. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 911.)

Richard the Red De Burgh

M, b. 1259, d. July 29, 1326

Parents

Family: Margaret de Burgh (b. circa 1263)

Biography

  • Birth: Richard the Red De Burgh was born in 1259 in Ulster, Ireland.
  • Death: He died on July 29, 1326, at age ~67, in County Tipperary, Ireland.
  • Note: Richard Og de Burgh, 2nd earl of Ulster, the Red Earl. (1259 – July 29, 1326) was one of the most powerful Irish nobles of the late 13th and early 14th centuries, a son of Walter de Burgh, the 1st Earl of Ulster (of the second creation) and Lord of Connacht. His name, "Richard Og" meant Richard the Young, probably a reference to his youth when he became earl in 1271, or to differentiate him from his grandfather, Richard Mor. He was also known as the Red Earl.

    Richard Og was the most powerful of the de Burgh Earls of Ulster, succeeding his father in Ulster and Connacht upon reaching his majority in 1280. He was a friend of King Edward I of England, and ranked first among the Earls of Ireland. Richard's wife Marguerite de Guines was the cousin of King Edward's queen. He pursued expansionist policies that often left him at odds with fellow Anglo-Irish lords.

    He led his forces from Ireland to support England's King Edward I in his Scottish campaigns and when the forces of Edward Bruce invaded Ulster in 1315, the Earl led a force against him, but was beaten at Connor in Antrim. The invasion of Bruce and the uprising of Felim O'Connor in Connacht left him virtually without authority in his lands, but O'Connor was killed in 1316 at the Second Battle of Athenry, and he was able to recover Ulster after the defeat of Bruce at Faughart.

    He died July 29, 1326 at Athassel Priory, near Cashel, County Tipperary. (Wikipedia) Richard de Burgh, was the 2nd Earl of Ulster, 3rd Lord of Connacht. His name, "Richard Og" meant Richard the Young, probably a reference to his youth when he became earl in 1271, or to differentiate him from his grandfather, Richard Mor. He was also known as the Red Earl. Richard Og was the most powerful of the de Burgh Earls of Ulster. He was a friend of King Edward I of England, and ranked first among the Earls of Ireland. Richard's wife Marguerite de Guines was the cousin of King Edward's queen. He pursued expansionist policies that often left him at odds with fellow Anglo-Irish lords; he successfully defeated the King Felim mac Aedh Ua Conchobair of Connacht at the Second Battle of Athenry in 1316. His sister, Egidia de Burgh, was wife of James the Stewart of Scotland. His second son, John de Burgh, was husband to Elizabeth de Clare, a granddaughter of Edward I of England. Of his daughters, Catherine married the Maurice Fitzgerald, 1st Earl of Desmond; Joan married the Maurice FitzThomas FitzGerald, 4th Earl of Kildare; Avelina married John Earl of Louth; Matilda married Gilbert de Clare, 8th Earl of Gloucester; and Elizabeth de Burgh married Robert the Bruce, later Robert I of Scotland. His son John died in 1313, leaving the succession to his infant son, William. (Wikipedia)

    Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, usually called the Red Earl, the most powerful subject in Ireland, and General of all the Irish forces in Ireland, Scotland and Wales and Gascoigne, was a great statesman and soldier. He founded the Carmelite Monastery at Longhrea, built the castle of Ballymote, Corran and Sligo, and eventually retired to the Monastery of Athassil, where he died 28 June, 1326. He married Margaret, daughter of John de Burgh, who was grandson of Hubert de Burgh, who was the most powerful nobleman of his time. They had five sons and six daughters. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 911.)

Margaret de Burgh

F, b. circa 1263

Parents

Family: Richard the Red De Burgh (b. 1259, d. July 29, 1326)

Biography

  • Birth: Margaret de Burgh was born circa 1263 in Walkern, Hertfordshire, England.

Avelina Fitzjohn

F, b. circa 1232, d. 1274

Parents

Family: Walter de Burgh (b. circa 1220, d. 1271)

Biography

  • Birth: Avelina Fitzjohn was born circa 1232 in Surrey, England.
  • Death: She died in 1274.

Richard Mor de Burgh

M, b. circa 1194, d. February 17, 1242

Parents

Family: Egidia de Lacy (b. circa 1202, d. February 24, 1240)

Biography

  • Birth: Richard Mor de Burgh was born circa 1194 in Galway, Connacht, Ireland.
  • Marriage: He and Egidia de Lacy were married on April 21, 1225 in Meath, Ireland.
  • Death: Richard Mor de Burgh died on February 17, 1242 in Gascoigne, Aquitaine, France.
  • Note: 1st Lord of Connacht Richard Mor de Burgh, eldest son of William de Burgh; born about 1194, died 1243. 1st Lord of Connacht, founder of the towns of Ballinasloe, Loughrea and Galway. Succeeded by his son, Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster. (Wikipedia)

    Richard de Burgh, surnamed the Great, Lord of Connaught, was son of William FitzAdelon de Burgh, who married Isabel, natural daughter of Richard I, King of England. Richard de Burgh was Lord Deputy of Ireland in the time of Henry II, and was also Viceroy of that kingdom from 1227-1229. He died on his passage to France, Jan., 1243, whither he was proceeding, attended "by his barons and knights," to meet the King of England at Bordeaux. He married Una, daughter of Hugh O'Conor, King of Connaught, and had two sons, Walter and William. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 911.)

Egidia de Lacy

F, b. circa 1202, d. February 24, 1240

Parents

Family: Richard Mor de Burgh (b. circa 1194, d. February 17, 1242)

Biography

  • Birth: Egidia de Lacy was born circa 1202 in Meath, Ireland.
  • Marriage: She and Richard Mor de Burgh were married on April 21, 1225 in Meath, Ireland.
  • Death: Egidia de Lacy died on February 24, 1240.

William de Burgh

M, b. 1160, d. 1204

Parents

Family: More O'Brien (b. circa 1160)

Biography

  • Birth: William de Burgh was born in 1160 in Burgh Castle, Norfolk, East Anglia, England.
  • Death: He died in 1204, at age ~44, in County Tipperary, Ireland.
  • Note: William took his surname from the village of Burgh Castle, Norfolk, England. Very little can be ascertained about his background other than his family were minor gentry, and that his probable younger brother was Hubert de Burgh, later Earl of Kent. William apparently arrived in Ireland in 1184 among the retinue of Prince John of England, son of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. John apparently appointed him Governor of Limerick. Within a few years he was granted the manors of Kilsheeland and Ardpatrick, and in time, the castle of Tibraghty in County Kilkenny. Sometime in the 1190s, William married a daughter of Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brian, King of Thomond (died 1194). This alliance probably took place during the reign of his son, Murtough, as up to the time of his death Donal had being at war with the Normans. At any rate no more wars are recorded between the two sides for the rest of the decade. In 1200, "Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair went into Munster, to the son of Mac Carthy and William Burke to solicit their aid." This marked the start of de Burgh's interest in the province. Though King of Connacht Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair (reigned 1190 - 1224) faced much opposition, mainly from within his own family and wished to engage Burke's aid to help secure his position. The following year William and Ua Conchobair led an army from Limerick to Tuam and finally to Boyle. Ua Conchobair's rival, Cathal Carragh Ua Conchobair marched at the head of his army to give them battle but was killed in a combined Burke/Ua Conchobair onslaught after a week of skirmishing between the two sides. William and Ua Conchobair then travelled to Iar Connacht and stayed at Cong for Easter. Here, William and the sons of Rory O'Flaherty conspired to kill Ua Conchobair but the plot was foiled, apparently by holy oaths they were made to swear by the local Coarb family. However, when de Burgh demanded payment for himself and his retinue, battle finally broke out with over seven hundred of de Burgh's followers said to have being killed. William, however, managed to return to Limerick. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

More O'Brien

F, b. circa 1160

Parents

Family: William de Burgh (b. 1160, d. 1204)

Biography

  • Birth: More O'Brien was born circa 1160.

Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brian, King of Thomond

M, b. circa 1130

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brian, King of Thomond, was born circa 1130.

John de Burgh

M, b. circa 1240

Family: Cecily of Baliol (b. circa 1240)

Biography

  • Birth: John de Burgh was born circa 1240.

Cecily of Baliol

F, b. circa 1240

Parents

Family: John de Burgh (b. circa 1240)

Biography

  • Birth: Cecily of Baliol was born circa 1240 in Gainford, Durhamshire, England.

John of Baliol

M, b. circa 1212, d. October 27, 1269

Parents

Family: Devorguilla of Galloway (b. circa 1210, d. January 28, 1290)

Biography

  • Birth: John of Baliol was born circa 1212 in Barnard Castle, Teesdale, Durham, England.
  • Death: He died on October 27, 1269.
  • Note: John de Balliol (c. 1212 - 27 October 1268/1269), was the father of the future king John of Scotland by Devorguilla of Galloway, daughter of Margaret of Huntingdon and Alan, Lord of Galloway, whom he married c. 1233. Balliol College of the University of Oxford was founded by him in fulfillment of a pledge and endowed by Devorguilla. He was born in Barnard Castle to Hugh de Balliol, Lord Gainford (c. 1177 - February 2, 1229) and Cecilia de Fontaines.

    His paternal grandparents were Eustace de Balliol, Lord Teesdah (c. 1155 - 1210) and Petronille FitzPiers. She was a daughter of Piers de Lutegareshale and sister of Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex. He was a great-grandson of Bernard II de Balliol (c. 1115 - 1188) and Agness de Picquigny. Bernard was born in Bailleul, Nord. He was a fourth-generation descedant of a senior Bernard Balliol (c. 1095 - 1122). This ancestor was born in Bywell. He was a fifth-generation descedant of a senior Hugh de Balliol (c. 1065 - 1122). This ancestor was born in Bailleul-en-Vimeu , Somme. He was a sixth-generation descedant of Rainald de Balliol (c. 1040 - 1086). He was a seventh-generation descedant of Guy de Balliol (c. 1022 - 1122). (Wikipedia.)

Devorguilla of Galloway

F, b. circa 1210, d. January 28, 1290

Parents

Family 1: Laurence Abernethy (b. 1195, d. 1245)

Family 2: John of Baliol (b. circa 1212, d. October 27, 1269)

Biography

  • Birth: Devorguilla of Galloway was born circa 1210.
  • Death: She died on January 28, 1290.
  • Note: Dervorguilla of Galloway (c.1210 - January 28, 1290), also known as Derborgaill or Dearbhorghil, was a 'lady of substance' during the 13th century, wife from 1223 of John, 5th Baron de Balliol, and mother of the future king John I of Scotland. She was a daughter and heiress of Celtic Lord Alan of Galloway and his second wife Margaret of Huntingdon. Through her mother, she was a descendent of king David I of Scotland. Born in or around 1210, she was a grand-daughter of Maud of Chester, and of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon, himself the youngest brother to two Kings of Scotland, Malcolm IV and William the Lion, Dervorguilla's mother Margaret being the couple's eldest daughter. As her father died without sons, according to both Anglo-Norman feudal laws and to ancient Gaelic customs, she was one of his heiresses. This might be considered an unusual practice in England, but it was more common in Scotland and in Western feudal tradition. Because of this, Dervorguilla bequeathed lands in Galloway to her descendants, the Baliol and the Comyns. Dervorguilla's son John of Scotland was briefly a King of Scots too, known as Toom Tabard (Scots: 'puppet king'). The Balliol family into which Dervorguilla married was based at Barnard Castle in County Durham, England. Although the date of her birth is uncertain, her apparent age of 13 was by no means unusually early for betrothal and marriage at the time.

    In 1263, her husband Sir John was required to make penance after a land dispute with Walter Kirkham, Bishop of Durham. Part of this took the very expensive form of founding a College for the poor at the University of Oxford. Sir John's own finances were less substantial than those of his wife, however, and long after his death it fell to Dervorguilla to confirm the foundation, with the blessing of the same Bishop as well as the University hierarchy. She established a permanent endowment for the College in 1282, as well as a Code of Statutes which still (ostensibly) governs the College now. The college still retains the name Balliol College, and its main historical society, the Dervorguilla society, has been revived in recent years.

    Dervorguilla founded a Cistercian Abbey 7 miles south of Dumfries in West Scotland, in April 1273. It still stands as a picturesque ruin of red sandstone. When Sir John died in 1269, Dervorguilla had his heart embalmed and kept in a casket of ivory bound with silver. The casket travelled with her for the rest of her life. In her last years, the main line of the royal House of Scotland became precarious in its lack of heirs. Dervorguilla was the heiress after them in genealogical primogeniture. She died just before the young Queen Margaret of Scotland; if she had outlived her, she may have been one of the claimants to her throne. Devorguilla was then buried beside her husband at Dumfries Abbey, which was christened 'Sweetheart Abbey', the name which it retains to this day. The depradations suffered by the Abbey in subsequent periods have caused both the graves to be lost. John de Balliol (d. c. 1269). Balliol College of the University of Oxford was founded by him in fulfillment of a pledge and endowed by Devorguilla.

    Dervorguilla and Sir John appear to have had seven children, all styled 'de Balliol': Hugh (1238-1271); John (1250-1313); and Alan, Alexander, Cecilia, Alianora and Marjory, about whom much less is known. Due to the deaths of her elder two sons, both of whom were childless, Dervorguilla's third and youngest surviving son John of Scotland asserted a claim to the crown in 1290 when queen Margaret died. He won in arbitration against the rival Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale in 1292, and subsequently was king of Scotland for four years (1292-96). (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.)

Hugh of Balliol

M, b. circa 1177, d. February 2, 1229

Parents

Family: Cecilia of Fontaines (b. circa 1177)

Biography

  • Birth: Hugh of Balliol was born circa 1177.
  • Death: He died on February 2, 1229.

Cecilia of Fontaines

F, b. circa 1177

Parents

Family: Hugh of Balliol (b. circa 1177, d. February 2, 1229)

Biography

  • Birth: Cecilia of Fontaines was born circa 1177.

Eustace of Balliol

M, b. circa 1155, d. 1210

Parents

Family 1: Agnes Percy (b. 1222)

Family 2: Petronille Fitzpiers (b. circa 1155)

Biography

  • Birth: Eustace of Balliol was born circa 1155.
  • Death: He died in 1210.

Petronille Fitzpiers

F, b. circa 1155

Parents

Family: Eustace of Balliol (b. circa 1155, d. 1210)

Biography

  • Birth: Petronille Fitzpiers was born circa 1155.

Bernard II of Balliol

M, b. circa 1122, d. 1188

Parents

Family: Agnes de Picquigny (b. circa 1138)

Biography

  • Birth: Bernard II of Balliol was born circa 1122 in Bywell, Northumberland, England.
  • Death: He died in 1188.
  • Note: BARNARD DE BALLIOL, Lord of Barnard Castle, etc., who was at the battle of Northallerton, called "the Battle of the Standard," 3 Stephen, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Lincoln, 1142; took William the Lion, King of Scotland, prisoner at Alnwick, 20 Henry II (1174); married Agnes de Pincheni and had Eustace. (Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 125)

    Bernard fought for King Stephen during the civil war, was present at the Battle of the Standard in August 1138, and was taken prisoner at the Battle of Lincoln in February 1141. The date of his death is uncertain. Dugdale only believes in the existence of one Bernard de Baliol, but it seems more probable that the Bernard de Baliol referred to after 1167 was a son of the elder Bernard, and not the same individual. If so the younger Bernard was one of the northern barons who raised the siege of Alnwick, and took William the Lion, king of Scotland, prisoner in July 1174. He also confirmed the privileges granted by his father to the burgesses of Barnard Castle, and was succeeded by his son Eustace. Practically nothing is known of Eustace, or of his son Hugh who succeeded about 1215. (Wikipedia.)

Agnes de Picquigny

F, b. circa 1138

Parents

Family: Bernard II of Balliol (b. circa 1122, d. 1188)

Biography

  • Birth: Agnes de Picquigny was born circa 1138.

Bernard I of Balliol

M, b. circa 1095, d. 1122

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Bernard I of Balliol was born circa 1095 in Bywell, Northumberland, England.
  • Death: He died in 1122.

Hugh of Balliol

M, b. 1055, d. 1122

Parents

Family: Ameria de Montgomery (b. circa 1080)

Biography

  • Birth: Hugh of Balliol was born in 1055 in Abbeville, Somme, France.
  • Death: He died in 1122, at age ~67, in Bywell, Northumberland, England.