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Person Page 2,499

Olof Bjornsson King Of Sweden

M, b. circa 885

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Olof Bjornsson King Of Sweden was born circa 885 in Sweden.
  • Occupation: He was a Mitkg.

Ingeberg Thrandsdotter

F, b. circa 896

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Ingeberg Thrandsdotter was born circa 896 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.

Bjorn Eriksson King Of Sweden

M, b. circa 867

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Bjorn Eriksson King Of Sweden was born circa 867 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
  • Occupation: He was The Old.

Emund Eriksson King Of Sweden

M, b. circa 849

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Emund Eriksson King Of Sweden was born circa 849 in Sweden.

Emund Eriksson

M, b. circa 832

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Emund Eriksson was born circa 832 in Sweden.

Erik Refilsson

M, b. circa 814

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Erik Refilsson was born circa 814.

Refill Bjornsson

M, b. circa 796

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Refill Bjornsson was born circa 796 in Sweden.

Bjorn Ragnarsson

M, b. circa 774

Parents

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Bjorn Ragnarsson was born circa 774 in Sweden.
  • Occupation: He was an Ironside.

Thrand Jarl Of Sula

M, b. circa 871

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Thrand Jarl Of Sula was born circa 871 in Sweden.

Ralph Count Of Ivrea

M, b. circa 978

Parents

Family: Erneburge De Caux (b. circa 983)

Biography

  • Birth: Ralph Count Of Ivrea was born circa 978 in Ivry, France.

Erneburge De Caux

F, b. circa 983

Parents

Family: Ralph Count Of Ivrea (b. circa 978)

Biography

  • Birth: Erneburge De Caux was born circa 983 in Caux, Allier, Auvergne, France.

Asperling De Vaudreuil

M, b. circa 952

Family: Sporta Of Normandy (b. circa 951)

Biography

  • Birth: Asperling De Vaudreuil was born circa 952 in France.
  • Marriage: He and Sporta Of Normandy were married in 975.

Sporta Of Normandy

F, b. circa 951

Parents

Family: Asperling De Vaudreuil (b. circa 952)

Biography

Concubine

F, b. circa 933

Family: Richard I Duke of Normandy (b. August 28, 933, d. November 20, 996)

Biography

  • Birth: Concubine was born circa 933 in Normandy, France.

Canville De Caux

M, b. circa 958

Family:

Biography

  • Birth: Canville De Caux was born circa 958 in Caux, Allier, Auvergne, France.

William Peverell

M, b. circa 1054, d. February 5, 1112

Parents

Family: Adeliza (b. circa 1055)

Biography

  • Birth: William Peverell was born circa 1054 in Normandy, France.
  • Death: He died on February 5, 1112 in England.
  • Occupation: He was The Elder.

William I 'The Conqueror' Duke Of England

M, b. October 14, 1028, d. September 10, 1087

Parents

Family 1: Matilda Of Flanders (b. 1032, d. November 2, 1083)

Family 2: Maud Peverell (b. circa 1037)

Biography

  • Birth: William I 'The Conqueror' Duke Of England was born on October 14, 1028 in Falaise, Calvados, France.
  • Marriage: He and Matilda Of Flanders were married in 1053 in Castle Of Angi, Normandy, France.
  • Death: William I 'The Conqueror' Duke Of England died on September 10, 1087, at age 58, in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.
  • Note: Weis' "Ancestral Roots. . ." (121:23), (121E:22), (137:23), (139:23), (162:23), (169:23). Known as William "The Conquerer". Duke of Normandy, then King of England 1066-1087.

    Reigned 1066-1087. Duke of Normandy 1035-1087. Invaded England defeated and killed his rival Harold at the Battle of Hastings and became King. The Norman conquest of England was completed by 1072 aided by the establishment of feaudalism under which his followers were granted land in return for pledges of service and loyalty. As King William was noted for his efficient if harsh rule. His administration relied upon Norman and other foreign personnell especially Lanfranc Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1085 started Domesday Book.

    Born in Falaise, France, William was the illegitimate son of Robert I, Duke of Normandy, and Arletta, a tanner's daughter, and is therefore sometimes called William the Bastard. Upon the death of his father, the Norman nobles, honoring their promise to Robert, accepted William as his successor. Rebellion against the young duke broke out almost immediately, however, and his position did not become secure until 1047 when, with the aid of Henry I, King of France, he won a decisive victory over a rebel force near Caen.

    During a visit in 1051 to his childless cousin, Edward the Confessor, King of England, William is said to have obtained Edward's agreement that he should succeed to the English throne. In 1053, defying a papal ban, William married Matilda of Flanders, daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders and a descendant of King Alfred the Great, thereby strengthening his claim to the crown of England. Henry I, fearing the strong bond between Normandy and Flanders resulting from the marriage, attempted in 1054 and again in 1058 to crush the powerful duke, but on both occasions William defeated the French king's forces.

    Conquest of England

    About 1064, the powerful English noble, Harold, Earl of Wessex, was shipwrecked on the Norman coast and taken prisoner by William. He secured his release by swearing to support William's claim to the English throne. When King Edward died, however, the witenagemot (royal council) elected Harold king. Determined to make good his claim, William secured the sanction of Pope Alexander II for a Norman invasion of England. The duke and his army landed at Pevensey on September 28, 1066. On October 14, the Normans defeated the English forces at the celebrated Battle of Hastings, in which Harold was slain. William then proceeded to London, crushing the resistance he encountered on the way. On Christmas Day he was crowned King of England in Westminster Abbey.

    The English did not accept foreign rule without a struggle. William met the opposition, which was particularly violent in the north and west, with strong measures; he was responsible for the devastation of great areas of the country, particularly in Yorkshire, where Danish forces had arrived to aid the Saxon rebels. By 1070 the Norman conquest of England was complete.

    William invaded Scotland in 1072 and forced the Scottish king Malcolm III MacDuncan to pay him homage. During the succeeding years the Conqueror crushed insurrections among his Norman followers, including that incited in 1075 by Ralph de Guader, 1st Earl of Norfolk, and Roger Fitzwilliam, Earl of Hereford, and a series of uprisings in Normandy led by his eldest son Robert, who later became Robert II, Duke of Normandy.

    His Achievements

    One feature of William's reign as king was his reorganization of the English feudal and administrative systems. He dissolved the great earldoms, which had enjoyed virtual independence under his Anglo-Saxon predecessors, and distributed the lands confiscated from the English to his trusted Norman followers. He introduced the Continental system of feudalism; by the Oath of Salisbury of 1086 all landlords swore allegiance to William, thus establishing the precedent that a vassal's loyalty to the king overrode his fealty to his immediate lord. The feudal lords were compelled to acknowledge the jurisdiction of the local courts, which William retained along with many other Anglo-Saxon institutions. The ecclesiastical and secular courts were separated, and the power of the papacy in English affairs was greatly curtailed. Another outstanding accomplishment was the economic survey undertaken and incorporated in the Domesday Book in 1086.

    In 1087, during a campaign against King Philip I of France, William burned the town of Mantes (now Mantes-la-Jolie). William's horse fell in the vicinity of Mantes, fatally injuring him. He died in Rouen on September 7 and was buried at Caen in Saint Stephen's, one of the abbeys he and Matilda had founded at the time of their marriage as penance for their defiance of the pope. William was succeeded by his third-born son, William II. "William I (of England)," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 97 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1996 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    WILLIAM th Conqueror was the illegitimate son of ROBERT I, Duke of Normandy, and ARLETTA, a tanner's daughter. WILLIAM has been called one of the first modern kings and is generally regarded as one of the outstanding figures in western European history. After his father died, the Norman nobles honored their promise to ROBERT and accepted WILLIAM as his successor. Rebellion against the young duke broke out almost immediately, however, and his position did not become secure until 1047 when, with the aid of King HENRY I of France, he won a decisive victory over a rebel force near Caen. During a visit in 1051 to his childless cousin, EDWARD the Confessor, King of England, WILLIAM is said to have obtained EDWARD's agreement that he should succeed to the English throne. In 1053, defying a papal ban, WILLIAM married MATILDA of Flanders, daughter of BALDWIN V, Count of Flanders and a descendant of King ALFRED the Great, thereby strengthening his claim to the crown of England. King HENRY I of France, fearing the strong bond between Normandy and Flanders resulting from the marriage, attempted in 1054 and again in 1058 to crush the powerful Duke, but on both occasions, WILLIAM defeated the French King's forces. About 1064, the powerful English noble, HAROLD, Earl of Wessex, was shipwrecked on the Norman coast and taken prisoner by WILLIAM. He secured his release by swearing to support WILLIAM's claim to the English throne. When King EDWARD died, however, the witenagemot (royal council) elected HAROLD king. Determined to make good his claim, WILLIAM secured the sanction of Pope ALEXANDER II for a Norman invasion of England. The Duke and his army landed at Pevensey on September 28, 1066. On October 14, the Normans defeated the English forces at the celebrated Battle of Hastings, in which HAROLD was slain. WILLIAM then proceeded to London, crushing the resistance he encountered on the way. On Christmas Day he was crowned King of England in Westminster Abbey. The English did not accept foreign rule without a struggle. WILLIAM met opposition, which was particularly violent in the north and west, with stron measures. He was responsible for the devastation of great areas of the country, particularly in Yorkshire, where Danish forces had arrived to aid the Saxon rebels. By 1070 the Norman conquest of England was complete. WILLIAM invaded Scotland in 1072 and forced the Scottish King MALCOLM MacDUNCAN II to pay him homage. During the succeeding years the Conqueror crushed insurrections among his Norman followers, including that incited in 1075 by RALPH de GUADER, first Earl of Norfolk, and ROGER FITZWILLIAM, Earl of Hereford, and a series of uprisings in Normandy led by his eldest son, ROBERT, who later became ROBERT II, Duke of Normandy. One feature of WILLIAM's reign as King was his reorganization of the English feudal and administrative systems. He dissolved the great Earldoms, which had enjoyed virtual independence under his Anglo-Saxon predecessors, and distributed the lands confiscated from the English to his trusted Norman followers. He introduced the Continental system of feudalism to England, and by the Oath of Salisbury of 1086, all landlords swore allegiance to WILLIAM, thus establishing the precedent that a vassal's loyalty to the King overrode his fealty to his immediate lord. The feudal lords were compelled to acknowledge the jurisdiction of the local courts, which WILLIAM retained along with many other Anglo-Saxon institutions. The ecclesiastical and secular courts were separated, and the power of the papacy in English affairs was greatly curtailed. Another outstanding accomplishment was the economic survey undertaken and incorporated in the Doomsday Book in 1086. In 1087, during a campaign against King PHILIP I of France, WILLIAM burned the town of Mantes. WILLIAM's horse fell in the vicinity of Mantes, fatally injuring him. He died in Rouen on September 7 and was buried at Caen in Saint Stephen's, one of the abbeys he and his wife, MATILDA, had founded at the time of their marriage as penance for their defiance of the Pope.

    William I (of England), called The Conqueror (1027-87), first Norman king of England (1066-87), who has been called one of the first modern kings and is generally regarded as one of the outstanding figures in western European history. Born in Falaise, France, William was the illegitimate son of Robert I, duke of Normandy, and Arletta, a tanner's daughter, and is therefore sometimes called William the Bastard. Upon the death of his father, the Norman nobles, honoring their promise to Robert, accepted William as his successor. Rebellion against the young duke broke out almost immediately, however, and his position did not become secure until 1047 when, with the aid of Henry I, king of France, he won a decisive victory over a rebel force near Caen. During a visit in 1051 to his childless cousin, Edward the Confessor, king of England, William is said to have obtained Edward's agreement that he should succeed to the English throne. In 1053, defying a papal ban, William married Matilda of Flanders, daughter of Baldwin V, count of Flanders and a descendant of King Alfred the Great, thereby strengthening his claim to the crown of England. Henry I, fearing the strong bond between Normandy and Flanders resulting from the marriage, attempted in 1054 and again in 1058 to crush the powerful duke, but on both occasions William defeated the French king's forces. Conquest of England About 1064, the powerful English noble, Harold, earl of Wessex, was shipwrecked on the Norman coast and taken prisoner by William. He secured his release by swearing to support William's claim to the English throne. When King Edward died, however, the witenagemot (royal council) elected Harold king. Determined to make good his claim, William secured the sanction of Pope Alexander II for a Norman invasion of England. The duke and his army landed at Pevensey on September 28, 1066. On October 14, the Normans defeated the English forces at the celebrated Battle of Hastings, in which Harold was slain. William then proceeded to London, crushing the resistance he encountered on the way. On Christmas Day he was crowned king of England in Westminster Abbey. The English did not accept foreign rule without a struggle. William met the opposition, which was particularly violent in the north and west, with strong measures; he was responsible for the devastation of great areas of the country, particularly in Yorkshire, where Danish forces had arrived to aid the Saxon rebels. By 1070 the Norman conquest of England was complete. William invaded Scotland in 1072 and forced the Scottish king Malcolm III MacDuncan to pay him homage. During the succeeding years the Conqueror crushed insurrections among his Norman followers, including that incited in 1075 by Ralph de Guader, 1st earl of Norfolk, and Roger Fitzwilliam, earl of Hereford, and a series of uprisings in Normandy led by his eldest son Robert, who later became Robert II, duke of Normandy. His Achievements
    One feature of William's reign as king was his reorganization of the English feudal and administrative systems. He dissolved the great earldoms, which had enjoyed virtual independence under his Anglo-Saxon predecessors, and distributed the lands confiscated from the English to his trusted Norman followers. He introduced the Continental system of feudalism; by the Oath of Salisbury of 1086 all landlords swore allegiance to William, thus establishing the precedent that a vassal's loyalty to the king overrode his fealty to his immediate lord. The feudal lords were compelled to acknowledge the jurisdiction of the local courts, which William retained along with many other Anglo-Saxon institutions. The ecclesiastical and secular courts were separated, and the power of the papacy in English affairs was greatly curtailed. Another outstanding accomplishment was the economic survey undertaken and incorporated in the Domesday Book in 1086. In 1087, during a campaign against King Philip I of France, William burned the town of Mantes (now Mantes-la-Jolie). William's horse fell in the vicinity of Mantes, fatally injuring him. He died in Rouen on September 7 and was buried at Caen in Saint Stephen's, one of the abbeys he and Matilda had founded at the time of their marriage as penance for their defiance of the pope. William was succeeded by his third-born son, William II.



    "William I (of England)," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 98 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Maud Peverell

F, b. circa 1037

Parents

Family: William I 'The Conqueror' Duke Of England (b. October 14, 1028, d. September 10, 1087)

Biography

  • Birth: Maud Peverell was born circa 1037 in England.

Robert II Of Normandy

M, b. 999, d. June 22, 1035

Parents

Family: Arlotte De Falaise (b. circa 1003, d. circa 1050)

Biography

  • Birth: Robert II Of Normandy was born in 999 in Normandy, France.
  • Death: He died on June 22, 1035, at age ~36, in Nicea, Bthyn, Turkey.
  • Note: Weis' "Ancestral Roots. . ." (121:23), (121E:22), (130:23).

    His nickname, "The Devil", was earned, at least in part, from the fact that he killed his brother, RICHARD, in order to make himself Duke of Normandy. AKA "The Magnificent"

    Robert contributed to the restoration of Henry King of France to his throne, and received from the gratitude of that monarch, the Vexin, as an additional to his patrimonial domains. In the 8th year of his reign, curiosity or devotn induced him to undertake a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, where the fatiges of the journey and the heat of the climate so impaired his consitution he died on his way home. Some sources call him Robert I the Magnificent!

Arlotte De Falaise

F, b. circa 1003, d. circa 1050

Parents

Family 1: Robert II Of Normandy (b. 999, d. June 22, 1035)

Family 2: Harlevin De Burgo De Conteville (b. circa 1001)

Biography

  • Birth: Arlotte De Falaise was born circa 1003 in Falaise, Calvados, France.
  • Death: She died circa 1050.
  • Burial: She was buried in Abbey of St Grestain, France.

Richard II Duke Of Normandy

M, b. circa 963, d. August 28, 1026

Parents

Family: Judith De Bretagne (b. 956, d. 1017)

Biography

  • Birth: Richard II Duke Of Normandy was born circa 963 in Normandy, France.
  • Marriage: He and Judith De Bretagne were married in 1000 in Normandy, France.
  • Death: Richard II Duke Of Normandy died on August 28, 1026 in Fecamp, Seine Inferieure, France.
  • Note: Richard The Good. He was the son and heir of Richard I the Fearless and the Duchess Gunnor. Richard succeeded his father as Duke in 996. In that same year he was married to Judith, daughter of Conan I, Duke of Brittany. They had six children before her death in 1017. Richard II held his own against a peasant insurrection, helped Robert II of France against the duchy of Burgundy, and repelled an English attack on the Cotentin Peninsula that was led by the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred II the Unready. He also pursued a reform of the Norman monasteries. After Judith's death, Richard remarried to a woman named Papia. They had two children: Mauger, archbishop of Rouen, and William, count of Arques. Richard died in 1036 at Fcamp. Richard II held his own against a peasant insurrection, helped Robert II of France against the duchy of Burgundy, and repelled an English attack on the Cotentin Peninsula that was led by the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred II the Unready. He also pursued a reform of the Norman monasteries. He did not marry Geoffrey's mother. (Wikipedia.)

Judith De Bretagne

F, b. 956, d. 1017

Parents

Family: Richard II Duke Of Normandy (b. circa 963, d. August 28, 1026)

Biography

  • Birth: Judith De Bretagne was born in 956 in Bretagne, Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France.
  • Marriage: She and Richard II Duke Of Normandy were married in 1000 in Normandy, France.
  • Death: Judith De Bretagne died in 1017, at age ~61, in Normandy, France.
  • Occupation: She was a Princess of Brittany.

Gonnor De Crepon

F, b. circa 941, d. 1031

Parents

Family: Richard I Duke of Normandy (b. August 28, 933, d. November 20, 996)

Biography

  • Birth: Gonnor De Crepon was born circa 941 in Normandy, France.
  • Marriage: She and Richard I Duke of Normandy were married in 962.
  • Death: Gonnor De Crepon died in 1031 in France.
  • Occupation: She was a Duchess.

Conan I De Bretagne

M, b. 927, d. June 29, 992

Parents

Family: Ermangarde Of Anjou (b. 952, d. June 27, 992)

Biography

  • Birth: Conan I De Bretagne was born in 927 in Bretagne, Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France.
  • Death: He died on June 29, 992, at age ~65.
  • Occupation: He was a Count.
  • Note: Stuart's "Royalty For Commoners" (334:35) calls him Count of Rennes and Duke of Brittany.

    Weis' "Ancestral Roots. . ." (gen 21 of lines 39 & 214) acknowlwdges Conan and ERMENGARDE as the parents of Geoffrey. Weis carries ERMENGARDE's pedigree further back, but makes no attempt at guessing the parentage of Conan. (121:21) identifies Conan and ERMENGARDE as the parents of JUDITH. Also mentioned (121E:21).

    Extracted from the Book, "The Bretons", by Galliou and Jones: "From c.970 Conan I acted as Duke of Brittany. His family retained the title, though they also used that of Count until 1066. But they had a hard struggle both internally and externally to maintain their authority. In particular, they were faced with the rise of powerful neighboring principalities, Anjou, Blois-Chartres, and Normandy, replacing the distant Capetian influence. This led to frequent intervention by outsiders into Breton affairs, though it also had the ultimately beneficial consequence of promoting - as Carolingian intervention had done earlier - a sense of Breton identity. It was the COUNTS OF ANJOU whose ambitions first affected the province. Siezing their opportunity during the minority of Barbrtote's sons and exploiting the weakness of the Counts of Nantes, FULK I (RIN 1250) and his successors, especially FULK NERRA (987-1040) (RIN 1258), acted as protectors or even exercised control directly at Nantes. It was in defence of these interests that THE ANGEVINS twice faught with Conan I at Conqueril not far from the Vilaine on the frontier between the counties of Rennes and Nantes. On the latter occasion in 992, though his forces won the battle, Conan lost his life. [Note that Conan's wife was the sister of his nemesis FULK NERRA]. At the start of this ANGEVIN ascendancy their immediate rival in Breton affairs was the HOUSE OF BLOIS. As the COUNTS of ANJOU supported the Counts of Nantes, so the COUNTS OF BLOIS supported those of RENNES. Beginning in the 990s, the DUKES OF NORMANDY replaced the COUNTS OF BLOIS as the primary influence on the COUNTS OF RENNES. The NORMANS were able to exact a form of feudal recognition, later interpreted as constituting homage, from the COUNTS OF RENNES. Note the double marriage alliance of the son and daughter of Conan to the daughter and son of RICHARD I, DUKE OF NORMANDY.

Ermangarde Of Anjou

F, b. 952, d. June 27, 992

Parents

Family: Conan I De Bretagne (b. 927, d. June 29, 992)

Biography

  • Birth: Ermangarde Of Anjou was born in 952 in Anjou, Tours, Touraine, France.
  • Death: She died on June 27, 992, at age ~40.
  • Occupation: She was a Duchess.