Little Chute Historical Society

www.littlechutehistory.org

Person Page 21,357

Barbe Laforest

F, b. October 6, 1725

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Barbe Laforest was born on October 6, 1725 in Baie St Paul, Petite Riviere, Charlebois, Québec, Canada.

Marie Genevieve Laforest

F, b. March 11, 1727

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Marie Genevieve Laforest was born on March 11, 1727 in Baie St Paul, Petite Riviere, Charlebois, Québec, Canada.

Jean Baptiste Gagnon

M, b. 1691, d. August 27, 1759

Parents

Family: Maguerite Marie Lavoye (b. September 2, 1710, d. September 7, 1791)

Biography

  • Birth: Jean Baptiste Gagnon was born in 1691 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: He and Maguerite Marie Lavoye were married on July 2, 1731 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Jean Baptiste Gagnon died on August 27, 1759, at age ~68, in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Note: Written by Sharron Cohen, April 2012
    Massacre at St Joachim -- 23 Aug 1759

    The British wanted Quebec City. They wanted all of North America, but in the summer of 1759 much of their military energy was focused on capturing the Ville de Quebec. In May, Admiral Philip Durell, in command of ten ships at the mouth of the St Lawrence River, prevented French war ships from ascending the river to resupply the city. On June 1st, General James Wolfe entered the river, along with Vice-Admiral Charles Saunders and twenty-two British vessels (five frigates, seventeen sloops of war, and a variety of transports). By June 23 they were at the Ile aux Coudres (about 45 miles downstream from St Joachim), where shoals and cross currents from intersecting rivers made the St Lawrence River increasingly dangerous to navigate. This kind of voyage with vessels of this size was seen as an impossibility without local pilots, so the British procured them by guile: A few of their vessels approached the shore, ran up French flags and invited the French inhabitants aboard. Only when they had boarded the British vessels did the French colonists understand they had been duped. Under duress, they were forced to aid the enemy.

    According to A.G. Bradley in "Bradley - Wolfe at Quebec" (http://canadachannel.ca/HCO/index.php/1759_Bradley_Wolfe_at_Quebec), the impressed river pilots were only as co-operative as the threat of death could make them: "Knox, who understood French, tells us that the poor unwilling pilot who took his ship up the tortuous channel made use of the most frightful imprecations, swearing that most of the fleet and the whole army would find their graves in Canada. An old British tar, on the other hand, master of a transport and possessed of an immense scorn for foreigners, would not allow a French pilot to interfere, and insisted, in the teeth of all remonstrance, on navigating his own ship. 'D - n me,' he roared, 'I'll convince you that an Englishman shall go where a Frenchman daren't show his nose,' and he took it through in safety. 'The enemy,' wrote Vaudreuil soon after this to his Government, 'have passed sixty ships-of-war where we dare not risk a vessel of a hundred tons by night or day.'"

    Fifty-two-year-old Abbe Philippe-Rene Robinau de Portneuf (1707-1759), better known as Rene Portneuf, had been cure (parish priest) of St Joachim for 24 years when the British ships came into view that August. British rules about churches were clear: British soldiers were to respect churches if the French did not make use of them for defensive operations. On the French side, there were three forces at work: civilians were forbidden by law to take part in military operations; the government encouraged them to get involved despite the law; religious authorities took a position of "prudent reserve," reminding their priests that their duty was to the spiritual lives of their parishioners and warning that priests who took up arms would be excommunicated. “If by chance the enemy come into a parish,” wrote Bishop Pontbriand in a pastoral letter dated 5 June 1759, “the parish priest will greet them as courteously as possible, asking them to spare human lives and the churches.” Most priests obeyed the stated laws of their church. (Of 194 priests serving in the Canadian church at that time, the historian Marcel Trudel has been able to count only about 15 who were “more or less engaged in the conflict.” Of those 15, only two died as a result: Joseph Couillard, who was killed in a skirmish while returning home after the French defeat on the Plains of Abraham was one. Abbé Portneuf was the other.)

    Unfortunately, the reality of war is always far less clear than its rules. Throughout the summer of 1759, British troops actively raided and destroyed small French settlements as they made their inexorable way up the St. Lawrence River. By the time they reached the cliffs of Quebec City in September, an estimated 1,400 stone houses would be in ruins, as well as many farms and some churches. General Wolfe reminded the French colonists that there was a penalty for being captured bearing arms, and he meted out deadly reprisals to drive home that point. Abbe Portneuf, who had never been known to engage in military affairs before August 1759, sent three letters to Governor Vaudreuil in the month before his death. Regardless of whether he was aiding the government or requesting aid for an increasingly frightened village, Portneuf's letters contained information about the British fleet's movements. On August 20, the governor instructed Father Portneuf to act in such a way that “the habitants be united, that they be constantly on the watch and able to put up the most vigorous resistance to the British.”
    What happened next is not accurately known, largely because there are too many versions of the story and every one of them is based on hearsay laced with bias told long after the event. English accounts claim that there were anywhere from 20 to 150 partisans fighting under Abbe Portneuf's command, that they were defying british troops from an entrenched position in an imposing house, even that they had disguised themselves as native americans. French accounts claim the number of participants did not exceed 50, and that the victims numbered a dozen. The French versions are clear about the inhumanity of the anglais, though far less clear about the details of the French colonists' deaths. Some claim that Abbe Portneuf had “his throat cut . . . in his own church,” another that his “head was split wide open and completely scalped," another claimed he was shot, another that he was “hacked to pieces by sabres,” perhaps while the priest and his parishioners were “on their knees crying for quarter. . . .” British accounts blamed the incident on Abbe Portneuf “for having abandoned his priestly role and roused some habitants to insult them.” Catholic priest and historian Abbé Auguste-Honoré Gosselin (1843-1918) wrote that “having withdrawn into the woods with some parishioners, in accordance with the bishop’s instructions . . . to administer to them in case of need the succour of his ministry,” the priest was surrounded and murdered. To the British, Father Portneuf was the aggressor; to the French, he was a martyr.
    Only one document (the burial register) comes close to being timely, although not entirely neutral. Since both the church and presbytery of St Joachim had been destroyed in the altercation with the British, the bodies were taken to nearby Ste Anne de Beaupre for burial. In that church's register, Jean-Louis-Laurent Parent, cure of that parish, wrote that Abbe Rene Portneuf had been “massacred by the British on the 23rd, being at the head of his parish to defend it against the incursions and hostilities which the enemy was carrying on against it.” (This account has been paraphrased from Dictionary of Canadian Biography online -- http://www.biographi.ca/EN/009004-119.01-e.php?id_nbr=1624 -- and in that entry the author, Jean-Paul Asselin, made a judgement: "The priest had well and truly taken part in resisting with a group of parishioners, thus justifying the action of the British." After transcribing and translating the death register for Abbe Portneuf, he added "Then come the names of seven parishioners killed at the same time," but he did not name them, as if the men who died with Abbe Portneuf were of no consequence to his story. In fact, the tone of dismissal employed by the author continued into the next sentence: "The affair of Abbé Portneuf was, in summary, a minor incident of the sort that happens in every war, but one that struck the imagination, probably because it was unusual at the period to see a parish priest die while participating in a military operation.")

    For the families of St Joachim, the August 1759 massacre was not a minor event of war, and the seven men who died with Abbe Portneuf do not deserve to be forgotten. I will name them to the best of my ability to transcribe the faded documents available online:

    Etienne Lessard
    Jean Lessard
    Claude (Caron?)
    Louis Pare, age 64
    Jean Gagnon, age 69
    Pierre Gagnon, age 61
    Charles Langdoc, age 48.

Maguerite Marie Lavoye

F, b. September 2, 1710, d. September 7, 1791

Parents

Family: Jean Baptiste Gagnon (b. 1691, d. August 27, 1759)

Biography

  • Birth: Maguerite Marie Lavoye was born on September 2, 1710 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Jean Baptiste Gagnon were married on July 2, 1731 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Maguerite Marie Lavoye died on September 7, 1791, at age 81, in L'Assomption, Repentigny, Quebec, Canada.

Pierre Gagnon

M, b. circa 1696, d. August 26, 1759

Parents

Family: Marie Anne Racine (b. August 4, 1701, d. June 1, 1771)

Biography

  • Birth: Pierre Gagnon was born circa 1696 in Québec, Canada.
  • Marriage: He and Marie Anne Racine were married on March 30, 1720 in Québec, Canada.
  • Death: Pierre Gagnon died on August 26, 1759 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.

Marie Anne Racine

F, b. August 4, 1701, d. June 1, 1771

Parents

Family: Pierre Gagnon (b. circa 1696, d. August 26, 1759)

Biography

  • Birth: Marie Anne Racine was born on August 4, 1701 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Pierre Gagnon were married on March 30, 1720 in Québec, Canada.
  • Death: Marie Anne Racine died on June 1, 1771, at age 69, in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.

Dorothee Gagnon

F, b. circa 1699, d. August 23, 1784

Parents

Family: Jacques Boucher (b. circa 1690, d. September 8, 1761)

Biography

  • Birth: Dorothee Gagnon was born circa 1699 in Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Jacques Boucher were married on January 14, 1718 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Dorothee Gagnon died on August 23, 1784 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.

Jacques Boucher

M, b. circa 1690, d. September 8, 1761

Parents

Family: Dorothee Gagnon (b. circa 1699, d. August 23, 1784)

Biography

  • Birth: Jacques Boucher was born circa 1690.
  • Marriage: He and Dorothee Gagnon were married on January 14, 1718 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Jacques Boucher died on September 8, 1761 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.

Marie Josephe (Sister) Gagnon

F, b. circa 1703, d. 1794

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Marie Josephe (Sister) Gagnon was born circa 1703 in Canada.
  • Death: She died in 1794.
  • Ordination: She was ordained in Sister of St Paul.

Marie Elizabeth Gagnon

F, b. circa 1705, d. November 29, 1744

Parents

Family: Louis Benjamin Dery (b. July 22, 1701, d. December 3, 1748)

Biography

  • Birth: Marie Elizabeth Gagnon was born circa 1705 in Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Louis Benjamin Dery were married on September 19, 1724 in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Marie Elizabeth Gagnon died on November 29, 1744 in L'Ancienne-Lorette, Québec, Québec, Canada.

Joseph Lavoie

M, b. January 13, 1678, d. April 20, 1727

Parents

  • Father: Rene Lavoie (b. November 28, 1628, d. March 11, 1696)
  • Mother: Anne Godin (b. October 16, 1639, d. February 16, 1678)

Family 1: Marie Francoise Guimont (b. January 17, 1685, d. November 25, 1726)

Family 2: Catherine Allaire (b. February 15, 1698, d. January 11, 1759)

Biography

  • Birth: Joseph Lavoie was born on January 13, 1678 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: He and Marie Francoise Guimont were married on November 21, 1701 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: Joseph Lavoie and Catherine Allaire were married on November 25, 1726 in St François, L'Île-d'Orléans, Québec, Canada.
  • Death: Joseph Lavoie died on April 20, 1727, at age 49, in Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.

Rene Delavoye

M, b. circa 1608

Family: Isabelle Belanger (b. circa 1609)

Biography

  • Birth: Rene Delavoye was born circa 1608 in France.
  • Marriage: He and Isabelle Belanger were married.

Isabelle Belanger

F, b. circa 1609

Family: Rene Delavoye (b. circa 1608)

Biography

  • Birth: Isabelle Belanger was born circa 1609 in France.
  • Marriage: She and Rene Delavoye were married.

Marie DeLavoye

F, b. September 30, 1630

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Marie DeLavoye was born on September 30, 1630 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.

Catherine DeLavoye

F, b. July 18, 1632

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Catherine DeLavoye was born on July 18, 1632 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.

Jeanne DeLavoye

F, b. September 6, 1634

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Jeanne DeLavoye was born on September 6, 1634 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.

Marie Lavoie

F, b. October 6, 1638

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Marie Lavoie was born on October 6, 1638 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.

Andre DeLavoye

M, b. February 23, 1640

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Andre DeLavoye was born on February 23, 1640 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.

Elisabeth DeLavoye

F, b. January 10, 1644

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Elisabeth DeLavoye was born on January 10, 1644 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.

Catherine DeLavoye

F, b. March 11, 1646

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Catherine DeLavoye was born on March 11, 1646 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.

Anne Lavoie

F, b. February 17, 1664, d. August 3, 1686

Parents

  • Father: Rene Lavoie (b. November 28, 1628, d. March 11, 1696)
  • Mother: Anne Godin (b. October 16, 1639, d. February 16, 1678)

Family: Pierre Allard (b. circa 1653, d. September 18, 1703)

Biography

  • Birth: Anne Lavoie was born on February 17, 1664 in La Visitation de I'lle Dupas, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Pierre Allard were married on November 22, 1683 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Anne Lavoie died on August 3, 1686, at age 22, in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.

Pierre Allard

M, b. circa 1653, d. September 18, 1703

Family: Anne Lavoie (b. February 17, 1664, d. August 3, 1686)

Biography

  • Birth: Pierre Allard was born circa 1653 in Lucon, Eure-et-Loir, Centre, France.
  • Marriage: He and Anne Lavoie were married on November 22, 1683 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Pierre Allard died on September 18, 1703 in St Anne de Beaupre, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.

Jacques Lavoie

M, b. September 12, 1669, d. January 3, 1752

Parents

  • Father: Rene Lavoie (b. November 28, 1628, d. March 11, 1696)
  • Mother: Anne Godin (b. October 16, 1639, d. February 16, 1678)

Family 1: Marguerite Angelique Garant (b. May 12, 1686, d. May 17, 1718)

Family 2: Marie Barbeau (b. circa 1690, d. December 11, 1767)

Biography

  • Birth: Jacques Lavoie was born on September 12, 1669 in Chateau Richer, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: He and Marguerite Angelique Garant were married on February 15, 1706 in Baie St Paul, Petite Riviere, Charlebois, Québec, Canada.
  • Marriage: Jacques Lavoie and Marie Barbeau were married on August 7, 1719 in Charlesbourg, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Jacques Lavoie died on January 3, 1752, at age 82, in Petite-Rivière, Charlebois, Québec, Canada.

Marguerite Angelique Garant

F, b. May 12, 1686, d. May 17, 1718

Parents

Family: Jacques Lavoie (b. September 12, 1669, d. January 3, 1752)

Biography

  • Birth: Marguerite Angelique Garant was born on May 12, 1686 in St Laurent, Isle de Orleans, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Jacques Lavoie were married on February 15, 1706 in Baie St Paul, Petite Riviere, Charlebois, Québec, Canada.
  • Death: Marguerite Angelique Garant died on May 17, 1718, at age 32, in Baie St Paul, Petite Riviere, Charlebois, Québec, Canada.

Catherine Labrecque

F, b. circa 1699, d. May 18, 1703

Parents

Family: Pierre Garand (b. circa 1645, d. January 7, 1699)

Biography

  • Birth: Catherine Labrecque was born circa 1699 in Québec, Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Pierre Garand were married on November 21, 1684 in St Laurent, Isle de Orleans, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Catherine Labrecque died on May 18, 1703 in St Laurent, Isle de Orleans, Montmorency, Quebec, Canada.