Little Chute Historical Society

www.littlechutehistory.org

Person Page 21,017

Edward Clarence Kelly

M, b. June 29, 1891, d. December 3, 1967

Family: Mary Josephine Cron (b. July 7, 1893, d. August 27, 1978)

Biography

  • Birth: Edward Clarence Kelly was born on June 29, 1891 in Michigan.
  • Marriage: He and Mary Josephine Cron were married on June 9, 1925 in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.
  • Death: Edward Clarence Kelly died on December 3, 1967, at age 76, in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.

Rosemary Kelly

F, b. April 8, 1926, d. May 26, 2003

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Rosemary Kelly was born on April 8, 1926 in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.
  • Death: She died on May 26, 2003, at age 77, in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.

Evelyn Kelly

F, b. November 27, 1927, d. January 1, 1983

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Evelyn Kelly was born on November 27, 1927 in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.
  • Death: She died on January 1, 1983, at age 55, in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.

Pierre Brun

M, b. January 26, 1818, d. February 22, 1888

Parents

Family: Therese Brissinger (b. February 21, 1818)

Biography

  • Birth: Pierre Brun was born on January 26, 1818 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Marriage: He and Therese Brissinger were married on January 8, 1849 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Death: Pierre Brun died on February 22, 1888, at age 70, in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.

Therese Brissinger

F, b. February 21, 1818

Parents

Family: Pierre Brun (b. January 26, 1818, d. February 22, 1888)

Biography

  • Birth: Therese Brissinger was born on February 21, 1818 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Marriage: She and Pierre Brun were married on January 8, 1849 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.

Pierre Brun

M, b. circa 1790

Family: Therese Rederstorf (b. circa 1790)

  • Pierre Brun (b. January 26, 1818, d. February 22, 1888)

Biography

  • Birth: Pierre Brun was born circa 1790.
  • Marriage: He and Therese Rederstorf were married.

Therese Rederstorf

F, b. circa 1790

Family: Pierre Brun (b. circa 1790)

  • Pierre Brun (b. January 26, 1818, d. February 22, 1888)

Biography

  • Birth: Therese Rederstorf was born circa 1790.
  • Marriage: She and Pierre Brun were married.

Antoine Brissinger

M, b. circa 1790

Family: Catherine Schnell (b. circa 1790)

Biography

  • Birth: Antoine Brissinger was born circa 1790.
  • Marriage: He and Catherine Schnell were married.

Catherine Schnell

F, b. circa 1790

Family: Antoine Brissinger (b. circa 1790)

Biography

  • Birth: Catherine Schnell was born circa 1790.
  • Marriage: She and Antoine Brissinger were married.

Mary Odelia Brun

F, b. circa 1874, d. 1960

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Mary Odelia Brun was born circa 1874 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Death: She died in 1960 in Ohio.

Melanie Willig

F, b. June 26, 1879, d. September 22, 1879

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Melanie Willig was born on June 26, 1879 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Death: She died on September 22, 1879, at age 0, in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.

Mathilde Willig

F, b. February 25, 1881, d. May 20, 1881

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Mathilde Willig was born on February 25, 1881 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Death: She died on May 20, 1881, at age 0, in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.

Maria Willig

F, b. December 31, 1882

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Maria Willig was born on December 31, 1882 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.

Joseph Willig

M, b. circa 1804

Parents

Family: Elisabeth Willig (b. October 1, 1807, d. January 21, 1892)

Biography

  • Birth: Joseph Willig was born circa 1804.
  • Marriage: He and Elisabeth Willig were married on April 27, 1829.

Frank Juen

M, b. May 3, 1858, d. August 30, 1933

Family: Rosalie Brun (b. March 19, 1856, d. December 17, 1940)

  • Anna Juen (b. February 18, 1887, d. November 24, 1973)
  • Emil Juen (b. May 26, 1888, d. March 31, 1889)
  • Helen Juen (b. March 17, 1894, d. October 22, 1970)

Biography

  • Birth: Frank Juen was born on May 3, 1858 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Marriage: He and Rosalie Brun were married on March 22, 1886 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Death: Frank Juen died on August 30, 1933, at age 75, in Torrance, Los Angeles Co, California.

Anna Juen

F, b. February 18, 1887, d. November 24, 1973

Parents

  • Father: Frank Juen (b. May 3, 1858, d. August 30, 1933)
  • Mother: Rosalie Brun (b. March 19, 1856, d. December 17, 1940)

Biography

  • Birth: Anna Juen was born on February 18, 1887 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Death: She died on November 24, 1973, at age 86, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co, California.

Emil Juen

M, b. May 26, 1888, d. March 31, 1889

Parents

  • Father: Frank Juen (b. May 3, 1858, d. August 30, 1933)
  • Mother: Rosalie Brun (b. March 19, 1856, d. December 17, 1940)

Biography

  • Birth: Emil Juen was born on May 26, 1888 in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.
  • Death: He died on March 31, 1889, at age 0, in Bendorf, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France.

Helen Juen

F, b. March 17, 1894, d. October 22, 1970

Parents

  • Father: Frank Juen (b. May 3, 1858, d. August 30, 1933)
  • Mother: Rosalie Brun (b. March 19, 1856, d. December 17, 1940)

Biography

  • Birth: Helen Juen was born on March 17, 1894 in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.
  • Death: She died on October 22, 1970, at age 76.

Andrew Charles Hopfensperger

M

Parents

Michel Charbonneau

M, b. November 22, 1699, d. December 10, 1773

Parents

Family: Genevieve Babin (b. December 28, 1703, d. November 26, 1741)

Biography

  • Birth: Michel Charbonneau was born on November 22, 1699 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: He and Genevieve Babin were married on October 12, 1722 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Michel Charbonneau died on December 10, 1773, at age 74, in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.

Genevieve Babin

F, b. December 28, 1703, d. November 26, 1741

Family: Michel Charbonneau (b. November 22, 1699, d. December 10, 1773)

Biography

  • Birth: Genevieve Babin was born on December 28, 1703 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Michel Charbonneau were married on October 12, 1722 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Genevieve Babin died on November 26, 1741, at age 37, in Contrecoeur, Vercheres, Quebec, Canada.

Jean Baptiste Charbonneau

M, b. August 28, 1735, d. June 17, 1791

Parents

Family: Marie Marguerite Daniau (b. April 19, 1735, d. February 16, 1797)

Biography

  • Birth: Jean Baptiste Charbonneau was born on August 28, 1735 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: He and Marie Marguerite Daniau were married on March 1, 1756 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Jean Baptiste Charbonneau died on June 17, 1791, at age 55, in Detroit, Wayne Co, Michigan.

Marie Marguerite Daniau

F, b. April 19, 1735, d. February 16, 1797

Family: Jean Baptiste Charbonneau (b. August 28, 1735, d. June 17, 1791)

Biography

  • Birth: Marie Marguerite Daniau was born on April 19, 1735 in Longueuil, Chambly, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: She and Jean Baptiste Charbonneau were married on March 1, 1756 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Death: Marie Marguerite Daniau died on February 16, 1797, at age 61, in Longueuil, Chambly, Quebec, Canada.

Toussaint Charbonneau

M, b. March 22, 1767, d. August 12, 1843

Parents

Family: Sacajawea (b. 1787, d. December 20, 1812)

Biography

  • Birth: Toussaint Charbonneau was born on March 22, 1767 in Boucherville, Quebec, Canada.
  • Marriage: He and Sacajawea were married.
  • Death: Toussaint Charbonneau died on August 12, 1843, at age 76, in Washburn, McLean Co, North Dakota.
  • Note: He worked for a British fur trading company before becoming an independent trader with the Hidatsa Indians on the upper Missouri River. When he joined the Lewis and Clark Expedition he was probably 47 years old. It was reported that while he was with the fur trading company he was stabbed by the mother of a girl he was trying to rape. Escaping this incident, he settled with the Hidatsa tribe and remained with them for the rest of his life. He was frequently employed by white people as an interpreter of French and Hidatsa. He once confessed to Prince Maximilian of Wied that even after 37 years with the Hidatsa he still spoke the language badly. Sometime around 1800, a Hidatsa raiding party captured an approximately 12 year old Shoshoni Indian girl by the name of Sacagawea. Four years later Sacagawea, and another Shoshoni girl, probably Otter Woman, were married to Charbonneau and Sacagawea was soon pregnant with her first child. In November of 1804, Charbonneau was hired by Lewis and Clark as an interpreter. Many historians believe he was only hired so that the expedition could get Sacagawea who was needed for her ability to speak Shoshone and Hidatsa. Sacagawea was needed to translate Shoshoni to Hidatsa. Charbonneau would translate the Hidatsa to French which was understood by several people in the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Charbonneau proved to be less than an ideal employee while on the expedition. In March of 1805 he was complaining because his duties also included manual labor and standing guard duty and he decided to quit. A week later he apologized and was again enlisted as an interpreter. On another occasion it was reported that he demonstrated cowardice and panicked when one of the boats nearly capsized, while Sacagawea kept a clear head and recovered many valuables the expedition would need. Three months later, in a family dispute, he slapped Sacagawea and had to be stopped by Clark. This was the only such incident on the journey, but coupled with the rape charge and his propensity to marry Indian girls under the age of 16 might indicate he needed to exert power over women. He was reprimanded again about his duty in October of 1805, but the charges were not elaborated on in the log books. After 19 months the expedition had returned to North Dakota, paid him $500.33. The expedition said goodbye to Charbonneau, Sacagawea, and their son Pomp who was also about 19 months old. Lewis thought very little of Charbonneau and his report was not good except for comments related to his interpreting role. Clark thought more highly of him and offered to take Pomp and raise and educate him. The couple decided that in one year he would be sufficiently old enough to leave his mother and Charbonneau volunteered to deliver him. He did not deliver Jean Baptist "Pompeii" Charbonneau until he was 6 years old. Charbonneau purchased a small plot of land from Clark and tried to settle down. It didn't work, so after a few months he sold the land back to Clark and returned to North Dakota. From 1811 through 1838, he served periodically as an interpreter tor the Bureau of Indian Affairs for which he averaged $300 to $400 per year. During the War of 1812 he carried out diplomatic errands for the US Government to the tribes along the Missouri River. In 1815, he went on an expedition to Santa Fe and was arrested by the Mexicans for invasion of their territory. In 1834, at about 80 years of age he took a 14 year old Assiniboine girl for his wife. The last record of the old man appears in 1839 when he appeared in St Louis to try to get his back salaries. It is believed he died around the year of 1843 at 86 years of age. That was the year Jean Baptiste settled his estate.

Sacajawea

F, b. 1787, d. December 20, 1812

Family: Toussaint Charbonneau (b. March 22, 1767, d. August 12, 1843)

Biography

  • Birth: Sacajawea was born in 1787 in Idaho.
  • Marriage: She and Toussaint Charbonneau were married.
  • Death: Sacajawea died on December 20, 1812, at age ~25, in Mobridge, Walworth Co, South Dakota.
  • Note: She was born a Shoshone around the year 1788 in their Rocky Mountain homeland which today is Idaho. Kidnapped by a Hidatsa Indian war party in 1800 at the age of twelve and sold to Toussaint Charbonneau, a French-Canadian fur trader who claimed her as his wife. In 1804, The Lewis and Clark Expedition was in full swing and had constructed a Fort which they named Mandan near what today is the city of Bismark, North Dakota. While wintering and waiting to proceed, they hired the couple as guides and interpreters for this journey from the Northern Plains to the Pacific. While waiting for Spring, Sacagawea gave birth to her son Jean-Baptiste Charbonneau. He soon became America's youngest explorer. She was the only woman to accompany the 33 members of the party to the Pacific Ocean and return. With the baby strapped to her back she became incredibly valuable to the group. The Indians along the route took the expedition as peaceful upon seeing mother with child. With her help, they were able to purchase horses needed to cross the Continental Divide. Her duties also consisted of digging for roots, picking berries and collecting edible plants all of which were eaten or used as medicine by the group. Many times she and her baby nearly lost their lives. On one occasion, the boat she was riding in capsized after being hit by high winds. On November 24, 1805, the expedition reached the spot where the Columbia River emptied into the Pacific. They settled here for the winter in an area which today is Astoria, Oregon. During the expedition's return journey, they passed through the homeland of the Shoshone. Sacagawea proved a valuable guide. She remembered trails from her childhood. The group returned to Fort Mandan marking the end of the trip for Sacagawea, Charbonneau and their boy, Jean Baptiste. When the trip was over, she received nothing but Charbonneau was given $500. and 320 acres of land. Six years after the expedition, Sacagawea gave birth to a daughter, Lisette. Charbonneau disappeared during a trapping trip and was never heard from again. There are two versions of the demise of Sacagawea. At the time of her death, Sacagawea was with her husband at Fort Manuel, a trading post in what is present-day South Dakota purported to have been stricken with a white man's disease. Her age was 24. Another version with credence indicates she died at the Wind River Indian Reservation (Wyoming) on November 1, 1877 at the ripe old age of 100. A known fact of record states that eight months after her death, Captain Clark legally adopted Sacagawea's two children, Jean Baptiste and Lisette. Baptiste was educated by Clark in St. Louis and then, at age 18 was sent to Europe. The fortunes of Lisette are not known but it is thought she may have never survived past infancy. Sacagawea was honored in the 2000 issue of the $l coin with the contrived image of her carrying the infant on her back.