Little Chute Historical Society

www.littlechutehistory.org

Person Page 73

Michael Jay Abendroth

M

Stephen John Ebben

M

Parents

  • Descendant of an Immigrant on: America

Petronella Maria Jansen

F, b. December 30, 1872, d. June 29, 1948

Parents

Family: Arnold VanHandel (b. March 25, 1873, d. September 9, 1949)

Biography

  • Birth: Petronella Maria Jansen was born on December 30, 1872.
  • Baptism: She was baptized on December 30, 1872 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: She and Arnold VanHandel were married on June 30, 1897 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Petronella Maria Jansen died on June 29, 1948, at age 75, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee Co, Wisconsin.

Peter (Petrus) Joannes Jansen

M, b. January 31, 1874

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Peter (Petrus) Joannes Jansen was born on January 31, 1874.

Aloysius Jacob Jansen

M, b. April 26, 1875

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Aloysius Jacob Jansen was born on April 26, 1875 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on April 26, 1875 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.

Ann Dunn

F, b. January 1, 1838, d. October 15, 1922

Parents

  • Father: John Dunn (b. October 9, 1806, d. May 20, 1887)
  • Mother: Catherine Lee (b. circa 1798, d. December 12, 1882)

Family: Everard (Edward) Jansen (b. October 11, 1832, d. January 20, 1916)

Biography

  • Birth: Ann Dunn was born on January 1, 1838 in Vermont.
  • Marriage: She and Everard (Edward) Jansen were married in 1855.
  • Death: Ann Dunn died on October 15, 1922, at age 84.
  • Burial: She was buried in Holy Name Cemetery, Kimberly, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.

Daniel Edward Clune

M, b. March 21, 1897, d. June 24, 1947

Parents

Family: Nina Unknown (b. December 6, 1887, d. September 1980)

Biography

  • Birth: Daniel Edward Clune was born on March 21, 1897 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on March 21, 1897 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: He died on June 24, 1947, at age 50.
  • Burial: He was buried in Racine, Racine Co, Wisconsin.

Catharine Mathilda Jansen

F, b. May 26, 1869, d. 1950

Parents

Family: Thomas Clune (b. February 15, 1857, d. September 16, 1929)

Biography

  • Birth: Catharine Mathilda Jansen was born on May 26, 1869 in Town of Buchanan, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: She was baptized on May 30, 1869 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: She and Thomas Clune were married on May 26, 1896 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Catharine Mathilda Jansen died in 1950, at age ~81.
  • Burial: She was buried in St Francis Cemetery, Hollandtown, Wisconsin.

Emma Cecilia Jansen

F, b. May 14, 1873, d. January 7, 1953

Parents

Family: John G Doyle (b. April 27, 1862, d. August 6, 1949)

Biography

  • Birth: Emma Cecilia Jansen was born on May 14, 1873 in Town of Buchanan, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: She was baptized on May 25, 1873 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: She and John G Doyle were married on September 28, 1904 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Emma Cecilia Jansen died on January 7, 1953, at age 79.
  • Burial: She was buried in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, New/1A/11 Only family name on stone.

William Edward Jansen

M, b. September 23, 1875, d. August 1, 1924

Parents

Family: Anna Kroll (b. July 16, 1875, d. November 26, 1945)

Biography

  • Birth: William Edward Jansen was born on September 23, 1875 in Town of Buchanan, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on September 24, 1875 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: He and Anna Kroll were married on January 18, 1898 in Kaukauna, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Death: William Edward Jansen died on August 1, 1924, at age 48, in Kewaunee, Kewaunee Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: He was buried in Holy Cross, Kaukauna, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.

Levi Carter

M

Family: Edith E Patton (b. September 17, 1912, d. September 7, 1989)

Stephen Sanders

M, b. August 27, 1818, d. September 8, 1881

Parents

Family 1: Christina Jansen (b. March 19, 1834, d. October 22, 1861)

Family 2: Maria Williamson (b. August 9, 1840, d. February 17, 1906)

Biography

  • Birth: Stephen Sanders was born on August 27, 1818 in Herveld, Gelderland Netherlands.
  • Marriage: He and Christina Jansen were married on September 11, 1855 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: Stephen Sanders and Maria Williamson were married on December 18, 1865 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Stephen Sanders died on September 8, 1881, at age 63, in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: He was buried on September 10, 1881 in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, Old/6/16.
  • Immigration: He immigrated to Maria Magdalena in 1848 Line 3.
  • Descendant of an Immigrant on: Maria Magdalena

Vaughn Paul Kosmosky

M

Parents

  • Descendant of an Immigrant on: America
  • Descendant of an Immigrant on: Maria Magdalena

Johanna Kregting

F, b. April 8, 1775, d. April 1, 1838

Parents

Family: Eugenius Willemse (b. February 13, 1769, d. October 7, 1828)

Biography

  • Birth: Johanna Kregting was born on April 8, 1775 in Nijmegen, Gelderland, Netherlands.
  • Marriage: She and Eugenius Willemse were married on July 11, 1802 in Ooij, Ubbergen, Gelderland, Netherlands.
  • Death: Johanna Kregting died on April 1, 1838, at age 62, in Ooij, Ubbergen, Gelderland, Netherlands.

Jacob Sanders

M, b. November 6, 1858, d. before 1870

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Jacob Sanders was born on November 6, 1858 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on November 6, 1858 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: He died before 1870.
  • Descendant of an Immigrant on: Maria Magdalena

John Peter Sanders

M, b. December 15, 1859, d. April 22, 1949

Parents

Family: Hendrika Geenen (b. April 6, 1860, d. August 8, 1943)

Biography

  • Birth: John Peter Sanders was born on December 15, 1859 in Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on December 15, 1859 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: He and Hendrika Geenen were married on July 12, 1881 in DePere, Brown Co, Wisconsin.
  • Death: John Peter Sanders died on April 22, 1949, at age 89, in Appleton, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: He was buried in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, New/3/56.
  • Descendant of an Immigrant on: Maria Magdalena

Theodorus Lamers

M, b. October 8, 1827, d. July 17, 1892

Parents

Family: Petronella Jansen (b. December 27, 1835, d. April 3, 1920)

Biography

  • Birth: Theodorus Lamers was born on October 8, 1827 in Driel, Gelderland, Netherlands.
  • Marriage: He and Petronella Jansen were married on September 5, 1859 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Theodorus Lamers died on July 17, 1892, at age 64, in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: He was buried on July 19, 1892 in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, Old/13/36.

Jacob Lamers

M, b. July 10, 1860, d. December 30, 1898

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Jacob Lamers was born on July 10, 1860 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on July 10, 1860 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: He died on December 30, 1898, at age 38, in Seaside, Clatsop Co, Oregon.
  • Note: THE DAILY ASTORIAN, SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 31,1898

    SHERIFF WILLIAMS KILLED AT SEASIDE
    ______

    Shot Down in Cold Blood Yesterday Afternoon by Charles Willard, a Desperate Character.
    ______

    DEPUTY LAMERS ALSO MURDERED
    ______

    Officers Were Searching Willard's House When the Terrible Tragedy Was Enacted - - Narrow Escape
    of C. W. Fulton and Constable Miller - - Murdered Shot to Death.
    ______

    THE DEAD.
    C. W. Williams, Sheriff of Clatsop County.
    James Lamers, Deputy Sheriff.
    Charles Willard, Desperado.
    ______

    THE WOUNDED.
    A. E. Miller, Constable of Seaside Precinct.
    ______

    Three lives - two honest men, one of a desperado, with the narrow escape of the lives of two other reputable citizens - one of unusually high regard and standing - is the sacrifice Clatsop county has been called upon to pay for the peace and good order the community of Seaside on her western border, seldom, if ever has so appalling a tragedy been enacted anywhere within the state of Oregon.
    Shortly after 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon the news was simultaneously received in the Western Union and railroad offices that Sheriff J. W. Williams, one of his deputies, and a desperate character named Charles Willard had been killed in a shooting affray at Seaside.
    Only the barest details were received, but the news fell like a thunder - bolt and flew like wildfire around the city. Further particulars were wired for, but little could be learned except that Clatsop county's popular sheriff and one of his deputies had been shot to death by the desperado Willard.
    At 5 o'clock the regular train left for the scene, carrying about 100 persons from Astoria. Nearly every man on the train was armed and all were determined that if Willard was still alive, he should be summarily dealt with. On the way to Seaside others boarded the train, and there were about 125 determined men in the croud when their destination was reached.
    At the depot, those who anxiously awaited the coming of the train briefly told the story of the terrible crime.
    Sheriff Williams and Deputy Lamers were cold in death, as was also the villian who had taken their lives. When the news was made known few were able to suppress their tears. The sheriff was known and beloved by nearly every person in Astoria, and his death was to many as the death of a brother. The bodies of the dead officers had been brought to a house near the depot, where there viewed by their grief - stricken fellow - townsmen. Sheriff Williams and Deputy Lamers were men of almost the same disposition, and each was very popular in his community. When the Astoria party entered the house and saw the men lying on cots, their features calm in the pallor of death, there were few dry eyes. "Poor Jack" was instinctively uttered, and nearly all turned away to hide the tears.
    A coroner's jury had been empanelled, and went to the Lewiston cottage to view the body of the dead murderer. The corpse, rendered hideous from awful wounds, lay outside the cottage just as it had fallen. Death was too good for him, everyone said, and there was no disposition to even cover the remains. Willard was a large, muscular brute, and, with his face shot nearly away, and the wounds on the body, he presented a sight that was revolting. The body was afterwards wrapped in canvass, and none too tenderly, thrown into a wagon which had been brought from Seaside.
    In the cottage was the murderer's arsenal, for he was a man who never went unarmed. Powder, shot, shells and loaded cartridges were stacked up in a corner, and bore silent evidence of the desperate character of the murderer. He had lived in the cottage for two months past and was evidently prepared for some expected attack from the civil authorities. Some of the shells were identified by Mr. Fulton as his property, and there is no longer any doubt that Willard was the fiend who destroyed the Fulton cottage some nights ago. To cover that crime and escape from justice Willard killed two men, and, but for the heroic action of "Jim " Lamers, would have taken the lives of two others - Senator Fulton and Constable Miller. The latter was slightly wounded by Willard before he was finally killed, and the coroner's jury went to his home to hear his story.
    ______

    WILLARD WAS SUSPECTED.
    The burning of Senator Fulton's cottage some days ago caused great indignation throughout the county, and Sheriff Williams determined to ferret out the mystery and bring the guilty party to justice. Several persons were suspected of the crime, but the finger of suspicion pointed strongest at Willard. He was a brutal - looking fellow, of gigantic physique, and the people of Seaside, where he lived for 8 years, always supposed him to be an outlaw, evading detection and punishment for crimes committed elsewhere.
    A search warrant had been issued and Sheriff Willians went to Seaside yesterday to serve it. He deputized James Lamers as an assistant, and, with Senator Fulton and Constable Miller, the latter of Seaside, went to Willard's abode. The sheriff knocked at the door and Willard came to a window. He was told that he was wanted on business, and he pulled back the curtain and peered out. Seeing Senator Fulton, he said: "Oh, it's you Mr. Fulton!" He had been asleep, it seems, and told the party that he would come out as soon as he had dressed. A few moments later he came from the house. When Mr. Fulton and the officers went into the cottage to make the investigation Willard followed them. Mr. Fulton found some shells in a corner of the room in which Willard slept and Willard seemed to realize that the cartridges were identified.
    "Now," said Willard, "I've been accused of breaking into houses around here, and I'm getting damned tired of it. I want the whole business cleared up. Come with me and I'll show you that some one has broken into the Carlson cottage" (of which he had charge.)
    ______

    WOULD NOT MARCH AHEAD.
    The five men then went from the house, Senator Fulton whispering to Sheriff Williams that he had identified the shells as some which had been left at his cottage.
    "Willard, you walk ahead, and we'll go to the Carlson cottage," said Sheriff Williams. "I will not walk ahead," replied Willard. "You take the lead."
    "Well, all right," said the sheriff. "But let me see your gun."
    The sheriff wished, no doubt, to see whether the cartridges found in the cottage could be used in the rifle which Willard carried, and which he had taken from the wall when he had suggested the trip to the Carlson cottage.
    "No, sir; you cannot see my gun. I never allow anyone to handle that gun." was Willard's reply.
    Then the men started for the cottage, Sheriff Williams, Senator Fulton and Deputy Lamers walking ahead, and Constable Miller and Willard following. They went to the house and Willard showed them where it had been entered. He again expressed his displeasure at having been accused of plundering the cottages at Seaside, and said he wanted a thorough investigation, so he would not again be annoyed.
    "Willard," said Mr. Fulton, the cartridges I found at the Lewiston cottage came from my house. How did you get them?"
    This brought out a long story from Willard, who said a former resident of Seaside had given him the shells. The man was named, but he has gone to Hawaii. The story was not believed and was probably invented on the spot in the hope that he could clear himself.
    Mr. Fulton then stated that he wished to make a further examination of the Lewiston dwelling, and the party returned, Willard carrying the rifle over his arm, and with his right hand on a revolver in his coat pocket.
    ______

    SHOT DOWN IN COLD BLOOD.
    Arriving at the Lewiston cottage, Mr. Fulton and Constable Miller entered the house, Sheriff Williams taking a station on the south side of the building, Deputy Lamers stood to the southwest and Willard near the front entrance.
    "We had hardly stepped inside the building when we heard two shots in (Continued on fourth page.)

    THE MURDER OF SHERIFF WILLIAMS
    ______

    (Continued from first page.)
    quick successsion," said Mr. Fulton. "Willard has killed Jack and Lamers," I exclaimed to Miller, and we rushed from the house. Fearing that we would run headlong into Willard, we went out the front door, knowing, from the direction of the firing, that the desperate man was in the rear of the house, where Lamers was stationed. When we turned the corner we saw Lamers and Willard struggling, but Sheriff Williams was nowhere to be seen. We ran over to the men and grasped Willard. As we did so Lamers staggered from him and fell, groaning near the cottage.
    "Willard was struggling desperately, trying to get hold of his rifle, which was lying on the ground near him. I knew there would be more shooting if he succeeded in getting it, and, throwing him to the ground, I kicked him on the head hoping to render him unconscious. He still continued to fight, however, and I seized a revolver and beat him over the head with it. He lay quiet for a moment and I thought he was unconscious. I then told Miller to stand over him and kill him if he attempted to fight, and that I would look for Jack Williams and summon assistance. Hardly had I turned back when Willard jumped to his feet and grappled with Miller. I had the rifle in my hand, but could not get a good shot at the desperado, fearing that I might kill Miller. However, I fired, and I thought at the time that the ball had missed Willard, although he dropped to the ground and I have since learned that it grazed his shoulder.
    "Again I cautioned Miller to carefully watch Willard, while I went for assistance. I started for town and had gone but a short distance when Willard jumped up and started to run. I called to him to halt, but he continued, and again I fired on him. The ball struck him in the face, and he fell. It seemed to me that he was dead, but I left the rifle with Miller in case he should offer further resistance. I then went on to town. Before arriving there I heard more firing, and was fearful that Willard had killed Miller. "Fortunately the reverse proved true."
    ______

    WILLARD FINALLY KILLED.
    Constable Miller tells of the third attenpt of Willard to escape after having killed Sheriff Williams and fatally wounding Deputy Lamers.
    "When Mr. Fulton left for town," he said to the coroner's jury "I went over to where Lamers was lying. He told he was very badly injured and said he thought he would die. He was suffering greatly. I tried to console the poor fellow, telling him that I had known of cases when men recovered from much more severe injuries than the one he had received. When we came out of the house after the first firing I had seen a dark object fall over the embankment hear the house, and, leaving Lamers, I looked to see what it was. Lying half way down the bank was the body of Sheriff Williams. I examined him and he was dead. I started back up the bank and saw Willard moving. He was struggling to regain his feet. but he was fatally wounded and had not the strength. Just as I came in sight of him he drew a revolver from his belt and fired three shots at me in quick succession. The first struck me in the leg and I jumped to one side, fearing he would continue firing. As I did so I stumbled and fell. Getting up, I brought the rifle to my shoulder and fired. The ball entered Willard's side, boring its way clear through him. He fell back, his hands trembling slightly, and I knew he was no longer to be feared.
    "I did not know how badly I had been injured, and ran to town for assistance. My wound is slight and causes me but little pain."
    ______

    MEANT TO KILL THEM ALL.
    There is no question that Willard meant to kill the entire party, and he was prevented from doing so by the action of Deputy Lamers in grappling with him. Had Willard succeeded in killing Lamers, he could easily have disposed of Senator Fulton and Constable Miller as they came out of the cottage.
    Willard was probably prompted to the act when he learned that Mr. Fulton had identified the shells found in the Lewiston dwelling. This was convincing evidence against him, and he doubtless believed that the indignant people would string him up for his crime. Rather than die at the hands of a mob, he made a desperate play for a chance to escape.
    Willard lived at Seaside for the past eight years. Where he came from, no one seems to know, but it is the general belief of people there, and has been for years, that he was a fugitive from justice. It is reported that he has shown sores from wounds received in fights with peace officers. Nothing definite was ever traced to him, but he has been suspected of the series of robberies occurring at Seaside in the past. He was about 35 years of age, and was unmarried, so far as known.
    ______

    SHERIFF J. W. WILLIAMS
    John W. Williams was a native of Kentucky. His father owned a large plantation there and was quite wealthy. When a boy his parents removed to St. Louis, and his mother and sister still reside there. He was employed in St. Joseph, Mo., for a number of years, and was connected with a large shoe manufacturing concern. He came west about 15 years ago, and had been in Astoria for about 12 years.
    It is no exaggeration to say he was the most popular man in the county. He was a man of charming disposition, and was familiarly known to everyone by the name "Jack." In 1896 he was nominated by the democrats for recorder, and was elected by a handsome majority. Last June he was the democratic candidate for sheriff, and, although he ran against a strong man, he was elected by 500 votes. He was absolutely fearless and it was one of his principles never to trust an important duty to a deputy. When the railroad trouble occurred, he went in person to the scene of disturbance, where an officer's life might have been in danger at all times.
    Before leaving his office yesterday he said to Deputy Sheriff Stuart in a joking manner, that he was apt to be brought home dead. He also requested that if anything happened to him, he be buried from the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Sovey, where he had stopped for the past two years. The body was taken there last night, and the last request of Sheriff "Jack" Williams will thus be granted. He was an unmarried man, and about 45 years of age. He was a member ot the Elks and Red Men. Arrangements for the funeral have not yet been completed.
    ______

    DEPUTY LAMERS
    Deputy James Lamers was an unmarried man and about 40 or 45 years of age. He lived at Warrenton for some time, but of late had resided at Seaside. He was quite large and strong and was very popular among the people on the West Side. His parents live at Japesville, Wis., (town not legible) and were notified last night of his death. He was a member of the Masonic order under the auspices of which the funeral will probably be held.
    ______

    VERDICT OF THE JURY
    Judge Gray, as deputy justice of the peace, called a coroner's jury and examined into the shooting. The jury found that Sheriff Williams and Deputy Lamers came to their death from gunshot wounds, inflicted at the hands of Charles Willard; that Charles Willard met his death by gunshot wounds at the hands of Constable A. E. Miller.
    The jury was composed of W. C Barrett, foreman; Henry Brallier, J. C. Hubbard, J. P. Merryfield, E. Kleinsmith, Frank Jewett.
  • Note: The San Francisco Call
    Saturday December 31, 1898
    THREE MEN KILLED IN AN AFFRAY

    ------------

    Tragedy Follows Fire in Oregon Town.

    ------------

    BATTLE WITH DESPERADO

    ------------

    FATALLY WOUNDS TWO OFFICERS
    BEFORE BEING SLAIN.

    ------------

    The Doings of a Bad Man From Texas
    Causes the Bloodiest Tragedy in
    the History of Clatsop County.

    ------------

    Special Dispatch to The Call.
    PORTLAND, Dec. 30.-- The burning
    of the Fulton cottage at Seaside last
    Wednesday morning culminated this
    afternoon in the bloodiest tragedy in
    the history of Clatsop County, as a
    result of which three men are cold in
    death and one other is badly wounded.
    The dead are:
    SHERIFF J. W. WILLIAMS, 1
    DEPUTY SHERIFF JAMES LAMERS,
    CHARLES WILLARD.
    Deputy Sheriff A. E. Miller was shot
    in the leg. It was considered certain
    by everyone that the burning of the
    cottage for the purpose of con-
    ceiling a robbery, and a suspicion
    pointed to Charles Willard as the guilty
    person, particularly as he was seen a
    short time after the fire coming from
    the locality with a wheelbarrow load
    of goods.
    Acting on the suspicion Sheriff Will-
    iams this morning secured a search
    warrant and, in company with Senator
    C. W. Fulton and others, went to Sea-
    side to search Willard's premises and
    also all the cottages of which he has
    charge during the winter season.
    About 3 o'clock this afternoon Williams
    Fulton and Deputies A. E. Miller and
    James Lamers, the latter two being
    residents of Seaside, went to the cot-
    tage of Mrs. Susie Lewiston, where
    Willard was living to search it.
    Their rap at the door was answered
    by Willard, who on learning what was
    wanted, agreed to permit a search of
    all the houses. On pretense of being
    on the lookout for a beach thief he
    picked up his rifle and said he would
    accompany them. They left the house
    and search the Carlson cottage, and
    then Fulton asked Willard to walk
    back to the Lewiston cottage.
    It was on nearing the cottage the
    second time that the tragedy occurred.
    Senator Fulton had identified some
    shotgun cartridges in the house as be-
    longing to him and began questioning
    Willard as to where he got possession
    of them. This nettled Willard, although
    he answered that a friend had given
    them to him and he began to get ugly.
    Fulton and Miller went inside the
    cottage, leaving Willard, Sheriff Wil-
    liams and Lamers standing outside.
    They had just preceeded to the rear
    room when two shots were heard in
    quick succession, and on running to the
    door Sheriff Williams was seen to
    throw up his hands and fall backward
    over the bank.
    In front of the house were Willard
    and Lamers, in a desperate hand-to-
    hand struggle, although the latter had
    been shot through the right groin and
    was fast growing faint, and his assail-
    ant was fighting with the desperation
    of a demon. Fulton sprang at Willard's
    head, and pulling him to the ground
    jumped on his face. Miller wrenched
    the rifle from his hand, threw it on the
    ground and taking out his revolver
    beat the desperado on the head.
    Senator Fulton in the meantime
    picked up the rifle and told Willard to
    remain quiet or he would kill him. The
    latter, however, watched his opportun-
    ity, and jumping to his feet started to
    run away, when Fulton fired missing
    him the first time, but striking him in
    the face the second time and carrying
    away the greater part of his mouth and
    nose.
    Willard fell apparently dead and Ful-
    ton started to obtain help to care for
    the injured men, leaving Miller on
    guard with the rifle in hand. Miller
    stepped back to aid Lamers, who was
    lying on the ground desperately wound-
    ed when Willard was noticed to be
    fumbling with his belt. Quicker than a
    flash he drew a revolver and fired three
    bullets, the first one hitting Miller in
    the left leg just below the hip. Mil-
    ler returned the fire with the rifle, the
    first bullet inflicting a flesh wound in
    Willard's shoulder and the second hit-
    ting him in the left side near the groin,
    killing him instantly.
    By this time help had arrived, but
    Williams and Lamers were beyond all
    aid and soon died. A Coroner's Jury
    was summoned, and after hearing the
    testimony, rendered a verdict in ac-
    cordance with the facts.
    The bodies of the three dead men
    were placed on board the train and
    brought to this city, those of Sheriff
    Williams and Deputy Lamers in cas-
    kets and that of the desperado wrap-
    ped in and old sail.
    Just how the shooting of Sheriff Will-
    iams and Deputy Lamers occurred will
    never be known, as there are no living
    witnesses now, but it is evident that
    they were taken unaware and were
    killed with bullets from a revolver, as
    six chambers of Willard's revolver were
    empty.
    Sheriff Williams was one of the most
    popular men in the city. He was about
    40 years of age, a native of Kentucky
    and had been a resident of Astoria for
    about ten years.
    James Lamers was also an unmarried
    man about 35 years of age. He was a
    carpenter, living at Seaside, and was
    deputized by Mr. Williams to aid him
    today.
    Of Charles Willard, the man who
    caused the trouble, very little is known.
    He came to Seaside from Texas about
    seven years ago and had always been
    considered a dangerous character. It
    was his habit to carry a rifle and two
    revolvers with him night and day, and
    he often remarked that he would never
    be taken alive. He lived by himself in
    a tent in Grimes Grove and earned a
    livelihood by looking out for certain
    cottages during the winter. It has
    been a notable fact for years that near-
    ly every residence not left in his charge
    was either robbed or defaced in some
    way.

Edward (Evert) Lamers

M, b. October 7, 1861, d. January 28, 1871

Parents

Biography

  • Birth: Edward (Evert) Lamers was born on October 7, 1861 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on October 11, 1861 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: He died on January 28, 1871, at age 9, in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: He was buried in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, Old Unmarked.

John Martin Lamers

M, b. September 29, 1862, d. December 24, 1935

Parents

Family: Wilhelmina Gerritts (b. January 19, 1864, d. January 2, 1936)

Biography

  • Birth: John Martin Lamers was born on September 29, 1862 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on September 29, 1862 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: He and Wilhelmina Gerritts were married on September 22, 1885 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: John Martin Lamers died on December 24, 1935, at age 73, in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: He was buried in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, New/3/25.
  • Note: John Lamers, 73, Succumbs at Home after Long Illness
    1935

    John Lamers, 73, owner and operator of the Lamers hotel at Little Chute for the last 25 years, died early this morning after a lingering illness. Survivors are the widow, two sons, Martin and Theodore, Little Chute; and five daughters, Mrs. Frank Austin; Mrs. Joseph Evers, Little Chute, Mrs. Wright Smith, Appleton; Mrs. Martin Peeters, Milwaukee; and Mrs. Herbert Gresenz, Madison. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Hendrika Lamers

F, b. November 7, 1863, d. December 27, 1887

Parents

Family: Nicholas VanGompel (b. July 27, 1862, d. November 14, 1887)

Biography

  • Birth: Hendrika Lamers was born on November 7, 1863 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: She was baptized on November 7, 1863 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: She and Nicholas VanGompel were married on May 27, 1884 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Hendrika Lamers died on December 27, 1887, at age 24, in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: She was buried on December 29, 1887 in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, Old Unmarked.

Henry Theodore Lamers

M, b. January 30, 1865, d. June 22, 1940

Parents

Family: Johanna Maria Schumacher (b. April 14, 1866, d. October 5, 1944)

Biography

  • Birth: Henry Theodore Lamers was born on January 30, 1865 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on February 1, 1865 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: He and Johanna Maria Schumacher were married on April 23, 1890 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Henry Theodore Lamers died on June 22, 1940, at age 75, in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: He was buried in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, New/1A/29.

Gerardus Lamers

M, b. May 12, 1866, d. November 22, 1945

Parents

Family: Allegonda Maria (Sara) Schumacher (b. March 31, 1870, d. December 3, 1943)

Biography

  • Birth: Gerardus Lamers was born on May 12, 1866 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: He was baptized on May 12, 1866 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: He and Allegonda Maria (Sara) Schumacher were married on October 27, 1891 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Gerardus Lamers died on November 22, 1945, at age 79.
  • Burial: He was buried in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, New/3/45.

Christina Lamers

F, b. July 5, 1867, d. June 14, 1920

Parents

Family: Jacob Jung Young (b. August 1866)

Biography

  • Birth: Christina Lamers was born on July 5, 1867 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: She was baptized on July 6, 1867 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: She and Jacob Jung Young were married on January 17, 1888 in Kaukauna, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Christina Lamers died on June 14, 1920, at age 52, in Appleton, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: She was buried in St Joseph Cemetery, Appleton, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Note: Obituary Appleton Post Crescent 6-15-1920
    Mrs. Jacob Young
    Mrs. Jacob Young, 54 years old, died at 10 o'clock Monday evening at St. Elizabeth hospital following an operation about two weeks ago. She leaves her husband, 12 children, 18 grandchildren, four brothers and four sisters. The sons are Arthur, Kenosha; Henry, Milwaukee; Theodore, New York, N. Y.; Edward, John, Steven, William and George, Appleton. The daughters are Helen Young, Appleton; Mrs. Felix VanderHours, Appleton; Mrs. George Schmidt, Manitowoc; Mrs. Roy O'Donnel, Green Bay. Brothers surviving are Henry, George, and Edward Lammers, all of Outagamie County; the sisters, Mrs. Henry VanderHeuvel, Vanderbrook; Mrs Theodore VanGinter, Milwaukee; Mrs John Kroll, Chili; Mrs Henry Van Dumlin, Appleton.
    Funeral services will be held at nine o'clock Thursday morning from St. Joseph church.

Gerarda Lamers

F, b. July 18, 1868, d. April 11, 1897

Parents

Family: Arnold VanDommelen (b. January 16, 1869, d. February 28, 1908)

Biography

  • Birth: Gerarda Lamers was born on July 18, 1868 in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Baptism: She was baptized on July 19, 1868 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Marriage: She and Arnold VanDommelen were married on June 6, 1893 in St John Nepomucene Church, Little Chute, Wisconsin.
  • Death: Gerarda Lamers died on April 11, 1897, at age 28, in Little Chute, Outagamie Co, Wisconsin.
  • Burial: She was buried in St John Cemetery, Little Chute, Wisconsin, Old Unmarked.
  • Note: Obituary 4-16-1897 Kaukauna Times Page A1
    Died
    Mrs. Arnold Van Domelen, died at her home in Little Chute last Sunday morning at 6:30 o'clock. The deceased had been sick for about a year with a number od complicated diseases which caused her death. The funeral was held from the Catholic church at that place on Tuesday morning and was very largely attended. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.